Browerville’s Cherry Grove Market drawing devotees from across the state

Cherry Grove Market in Browerville continues to expand the number and variety of items they offer for sale since the business opened Dec. 9, 2010. In addition to food items offered in bulk and in smaller packages, a shopper can find kitchen cutlery, rugs, baskets and cookbooks as well as handcrafted furniture. Robert McDowell, left, owns the market with his wife, Linda. Their daughters Melody, Crystal, right, and Dorcas work with them in the store. Their sons, Stanley, Andrew and Stephen help out sporadically, as their schedules allow.

Buying bulk foods is money-saving way of life

By Jennie ZeitlerStaff Writer

Before moving to Browerville in 2006, Robert and Linda McDowell learned a lot about the food service as wholesale distributors of homemade jams and jellies. Robert worked in construction, and with the industry downturn he came to a crossroads.

“We had thought about opening a bulk food market,” he said. Then he and his family came to this area from Wisconsin through a church outreach for Living Waters Mennonite Church.

“You can go almost anywhere and start a bulk food market,” said Robert. “We have stuff here people can’t get anywhere else close to them, and prices are better.”

To the McDowells, buying in bulk just makes sense; it’s a money-saving way to live.

The McDowells spent some time trying to find a suitable place for the market. The building they now own was just the kind of location they were looking for, but when they asked the first couple of times about buying it, someone else was interested.

Customers come to Cherry Grove Market from Wadena, Alexandria, Little Falls, Rice, Motley and the Twin Cities. Customers from Germany and Norway have also found their way to the market.

“During the summer we had a fair amount of tourist traffic,” Robert said. “We are thankful and blessed for the way it’s going.”

Cherry Grove is continually adding new things to the selection. “People have been impressed by the selection of spices we offer,” said Robert. “The bulk idea is a new idea for many people. They are getting used to buying a 50-pound bag of flour.”

People have told the McDowell family how nice and bright the market is, and how open with more room in the aisles. “People tell us we have filled a niche.”

Food items and ingredients arrive at the market in bulk and much of it is divided up into smaller bags for sale. But several items are offered directly in the 50-pound bags, such as flour and sugar. Frozen vegetables and meats are also offered.

The McDowells make their own jams and jellies. They also bake pies fresh in the mornings in the kitchen that occupies one side of the building. Local honey and maple syrup are offered, as well as many gift items handcrafted locally.

The line of organic and gluten-free products is increasing. Robert anticipates needing a bigger warehouse, although not for a while yet.

Kari Durheim of Pierz was in the area with friends and was drawn to visit the market after seeing a billboard advertisement. “We were charmed by the variety of whole, natural foods,” she said. “They have a large variety of specialty flours and a wide variety of local honey.”

Durheim took her daughter, Amy, on her next trip to Cherry Grove. “Amy also likes natural foods, and she bought a bread mix.”

Paul and Velma Anderson from Alexandria were referred to the market by a friend, who told Velma she could get coconut oil there at a better price. “It’s a very unique store,” Paul said.

Shelly Tostenson of Long Prairie is at the market every week. “I love this store; I’m glad it’s here,” Tostenson said. “The food is so fresh – this pie is still warm; it’s awesome.”

“It’s very clean, and we noted the sign on the door which said, ‘Thank you for dressing modestly,’” Durheim said. “It’s a charming place.”

The market, located on the south side of Browerville next to the Lakewood Health System clinic, is open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., closing an hour earlier on Wednesdays.

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