Kresha holding to his principles

To the Editor:

A few weeks ago a letter appeared criticizing Ron Kresha for voting against a broadband bill in the House. Now you will hear “the rest of the story.”

The bill covered mostly the Twin Cities and Rochester with government run systems.

Kresha was holding to a Republican principle when he voted against it: “Government should only do for people what they cannot do for themselves.”

High speed Internet is available at many locations around Central Minnesota including libraries. Many satellite Internet systems are available. Why should government supply government run fiber optics in competition with private enterprise?

For the past two years, the DFL-controlled Legislature and DFL governor have increased spending by $1.7 billion growing government by 12 percent and increasing the budgets of nearly every government agency.

The DFL is all about income redistribution, the government taking from one person to give to another through government. Ron Kresha knows that the best income redistribution is a good paying job where, in a free market economy, people earn money to provide for themselves. That is why I am supporting Ron Kresha for re-election in November.

Keep up the good work of holding to Republican principles. — Aleta Edin, Burtrum

  • Federal

    Aleta is exactly right. It’s a Republican principle that rural people can
    drive to the library for internet access instead of having broadband in
    their home or business.
    It’s a Republican principle that rural MN can sit here and wait until the
    wealthy corporations that support their party decide to throw us a few
    crumbs.
    The earlier letters she’s referring to proved Ron Kresha was claiming he
    supported rural broadband. Ron Kresha voted against rural broadband.
    Is that a Republican principle? Also Kresha voted against34.36 million
    for local road improvements and 33 million for local bridge replacement
    program. Who does Kresha represent? Sure not rural Minnesota.

    • LF Taxpayer

      What else was contained in those bills?

  • Federal

    Aleta is exactly right. It’s a Republican principle that rural people can
    drive to the library for internet access instead of having broadband in
    their home or business.
    It’s a Republican principle that rural MN can sit here and wait until the
    wealthy corporations that support their party decide to throw us a few
    crumbs.
    The earlier letters she’s referring to proved Ron Kresha was claiming he
    supported rural broadband. Ron Kresha voted against rural broadband.
    is that a Republican principle?
    Also Kresha vote against local road improvements grants and local bridge
    replacement program for a total of 87,36 million. That’s sure not supporting
    rural MN and Dist 9 B.

    • josh

      If you cant live without super high speed internet you have bigger problems to worry about.

      • Erik Warner

        Josh – Though I see the point you are trying to make I’d just add that there are many people in rural areas who are operating businesses which rely heavily on internet access (my wife and I are among that group). Much of what we do is done online; tracking down our buys, communicating with potential sellers, arranging purchases, researching products for use in our business, ordering materials and supplies, marketing, sales, etc. Access to high speed internet is what makes our business function and is, in great part, what has allowed us to grow. Investment in the infrastructure is good for business and good for job growth.

      • Federal

        Why did Kresha say he supported it. When it is a fact he didn’t vote for it. Now you supporter are saying it is no big deal. Why?

        • Erik Warner

          A) I might or might not be a supporter of Rep. Kresha in this election cycle. I know both Rep. Kresha and Al Doty and know them both to be men of integrity, intelligence, compassion, and thoughtfulness. Either one of them would represent us well. Casting my vote this time around is going to be difficult. Actually, I kind of wish they could job-share. :-)

          B) There may have been some things in the legislation that just didn’t sit well with Rep. Kresha. For example, something so simple as a wording change at the last minute can dramatically change how the law will actually function. I don’t know.

      • Dragoon

        Let’s not forgot how public schools are becoming more and more internet
        and technology driven. Text book companies are phasing out printed text.
        If the district can find hard copies, they are often three times the
        cost of the digital version and they do not come with the additional
        apps and software that the school uses in their “smart” classrooms.

        This
        isn’t just about being able to access Facebook. The entire world is
        becoming one that needs high speed internet in order to conduct business
        and educate. You might not like that change, but that’s the reality of
        the world we live in. We can drag our feet and fall behind the rest of
        the nation, or we can step up and supply to our small local business and
        our public schools with the tools they need to compete in the modern
        world.

    • robin hensel

      It is absolutely mind boggling that Kresha voted against road improvements and local bridge replacement. He must not need to use that bridge or drive those particular roads to get to his work or church.

  • Rick Witte

    So Aleta what “good paying jobs” has Kresha produced during the last few years? Does not funding the maintaining of roads and bridges produce good paying jobs? Would not building a fiber network where the private sector finds no short term return on investment produce good paying jobs?

    It seems todays Republican Party would be against rural electrification. They would outlaw those quasi communistic/socialistic organizations such as electric and phone cooperatives. Understanding that “cooperative” is nothing more than a underhanded ploy by the Democrat Party to turn this country into a “Socialist State”. And lets not get into SSA and Medicare, those certainly Socialistic programs run by the government. Yes lets go back to the days when the elderly lived in abject poverty chosing between food and Medicine left to the ravages of the private markets which certainly would have their protection as a primary concern.

    Certainly Mr. Kresha must be against the government running fiber between schools for isnt that a function of the private sector.

    • josh

      I would rather be poor and on the verge of death then ruled by a class of socialist elites that provide medicine. If you give your freedoms over for faux security you will have neither security or freedom. I am sure Mr. Kresha voted with his conscience.

      • Rick Witte

        josh when you get to the point in school where you learn what Socialism is come back and we’ll talk.

        • josh

          It is basically a theory or organization that says production and such should be regulated by a community as a whole.
          Or in Socialism based on Marxism the realization of communism or the overthrow of capitalism.
          As a whole I don’t own your kids nor you own mine. It is not your responsibility to teach my kids nor is it mine. It can be our choice but it should no the law. I should be able to choose my healthcare or if I want it and not be forced to have it (Obamacare=socialism)
          Can we talk now?

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