EPA’s plan a step in the right direction

To the Editor:

For years, many of us here in Minnesota have relished long days outside hunting, fishing and wildlife watching. Our outdoor traditions are part of our local culture. What we don’t relish however, is being infected by a tick or bringing home an itchy poison ivy rash.

Thanks to a new report by the National Wildlife Federation, I realize that my time spent outdoors might be cut short if we don’t tackle climate change. “Ticked Off: The Outdoor Experience and Climate Change” cites the science and explains how climate change is increasing the numbers and ranges of bothersome pests like deer ticks, tiger mosquitoes, stink bugs and poison ivy.

This report sends a clear message that we must combat climate change if there is any hope in preserving our cherished outdoor experiences. Fortunately, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed the Clean Power Plan, which would limit the amount of carbon pollution from power plants.

This rule is a step in the right direction and I encourage others to support the rule not just for my own outdoor benefit, but for the chance to save our local outdoor culture. — Dr. Bill Faber, Cushing

  • robin hensel

    People may want to watch an interesting documentary titled “Under Our Skin” about Lyme disease…fascinating and thought provoking.

    • newpolitiq7

      Also, not mentioned in my earlier post, the % of folks who identify as Repub’s/Tea Party here who’d agree that climate change is a devastating, real issue now — as we speak — let’s just say the Tea Party climate change “deniers” rule the day in Morrison Co. Have you listened to KLTF – Up Front at all in the last several years? (duh — probably not, you’re a doctor, and you work at science for a living) The hosts on that show, Steve Van Slooten and Perry Nouis, laugh at the notion of climate change. If you’d like to start locally with your efforts, you might want to speak with them about “science”.

      • Josh

        The problem with science is that not all science is looked at concerning so called climate change. I have never heard of climate change believers discuss the topic of the affect of the Suns hot spot in comparison with our temperature. As it is a cycle and the same period that the earth warmed so did mars, venus and mercury. Back in the 70’s and early 80’s science was claiming global cooling. I would believe that many of those in any party that don’t believe science at face have reasons for not believing it all or with caution which very well may be valid. A lot of the times just follow the money and you will find many of those pushing it are getting rich off of carbon credits and are hypocrites like Al Gore who drives gas guzzlers to speaking events and will hop in a Prius before he arrives at the event. I err on the side of caution when believing in any science data as many of it has been skewed or has an agenda behind it. Climate change is a very big agenda for some, research agenda 21 as you will find they want to use climate change to push for heavy restrictions on freedoms, private property etc.

  • newpolitiq7

    Thanks for an excellent letter. You may have a challenge in this area convincing even some of your fellow outdoor enthusiasts about the validity of actual science. Democrats trust scientists much more than Republicans do — and believe more in the existence of climate change. Any ideas on how we convince folks to “believe” in science?

    “Eighty percent of Democrats report having high trust in scientists (re: climate change), compared with 63 percent of independents and 46 percent of Republicans, according to the Stanford poll data. Partly as a result, Democrats’ concern about climate change is far higher than Republicans’ concern. Americans, as a whole, are less concerned about global warming than people in other rich countries largely because of low levels of concern among Republicans.” http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/02/upshot/is-global-warming-real-most-in-US-believe-in-climate-change.html?abt=0002&abg=0

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