Public hearings to be held on financing for Wabash Corporation

Staff Writer

Morrison County residents will get a chance to learn what subsidies the Wabash Corporation could receive should it come to Little Falls.

Wabash is a manufacturing company that builds trailers, shipping containers, cargo vans and more, and plans to purchase the Larson Boats facility.

Residents will also get the chance to speak their minds about subsidies at three public hearings on the topic, one for the Rural Development Finance authority (RDFA) and the Economic Development Authority (EDA), all announced in the public notices section of the Morrison County Record the past two weeks.

The first hearing is for the RDFA, Monday at 4 p.m. in the Morrison County Government Center’s Board Room.

Wabash is looking to use programs for job creation, job training and a dislocated worker program.

At 6 p.m. at the Little Falls City Hall, the EDA will hold two public hearings.

One deals solely with a grant the EDA is applying for to help Wabash, while the other is for that and other options the EDA is considering, Little Falls Finance Director Lori Kasella said.

The EDA is looking to apply for a $400,000 grant from the state’s Minnesota Investment Fund, which would be given to Wabash under the condition that it create a certain number of jobs in two years, Kasella said.

The other hearing would also cover the grant because it is a business subsidy, but it would also cover any other benefits the EDA would look at giving Wabash if the company met the goals within two years.

  • J. SKI

    I agree…
    Little Falls is desperate for any industry and the mayor/city council/county will bend over to get them to move here. Tax breaks, new roads & services, tax increment financing, etc., have all been used in the past to lure them.
    Businesses also get tax write-offs that individuals do not get…those write-offs will probably increase under the Trump(et) administration
    According to a recent news report, the water quality of the Mississippi river, from St. Cloud going south, gets worse the farther south that it flows. Much of the pollution occurs from agricultural runoff but many industries are still contributing.