The Morrison County Record http://mcrecord.com Covering community news, sports, current events and provides advertising and information for the Morrison County, Minnesota. Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:32:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Former sewing shop to reopen, with alterations http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/28/former-sewing-shop-to-reopen-with-alterations/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/28/former-sewing-shop-to-reopen-with-alterations/#comments Sat, 28 Feb 2015 16:29:21 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571967 By Gabby LandsverkStaff Writer

After a year-long hiatus, Lisa Kicker’s sewing and alterations shop in Little Falls will be reopening with a new name, a new location and a new look.

Lisa Kicker owns Casual to Formal Alterations, a new sewing shop on Broadway in Little Falls to open Tuesday.

The previous iteration of the shop was called L’A Rose Creations, which Kicker had to close because health problems prevented her from being at the store full time.

Kicker said closing L’A Rose didn’t stop customers from calling her for help.

“There was a definitely a need … there’s a difference between sewing and alterations,” Kicker said. “People try it, then hurry in to me to put it back together again.”

Kicker said after L’A Rose closed, she continued to work on projects from home for customers who just couldn’t let her go.

As a result, she still had all the equipment and paraphernalia from the previous store.

“Where was I going to put all this stuff?” Kicker said. “I needed to either do something or get rid of it.”

Reopening the shop was a natural solution to both problems; Kicker recently finished moving into, repainting, decorating and fully organizing the new space. She said the 300-plus regular customers of L’A Rose have been informed of the newly-named Casual to Formal Alterations.

Her fiance, Joel Johnson, came up with the name, after telling her the old one was “dorky,” Kicker said with a laugh.

As yet, Kicker is the store’s only employee, and she plans to run the shop full-time, although she may consider adding another employee and expanding her hours in the future.

The shop will offer a wide variety of services, “from A to Z” including alternations, buttons, inseams, lace repair, tailoring, uniforms and zippers, to name just a few.

Kicker’s favorite, she said, is bridal and prom dresses because of all the different fashions she’s seen come and go, and come again, in her many years of sewing.

“I love seeing the different styles,” Kicker said.

For now, Kicker said she’s just excited to be open for business again.

“I’m looking forward to getting it off the ground. I’ll have to hit the ground running,” Kicker said.

Casual to Formal Alterations officially opens Tuesday. Business hours will be from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday.

For more information, call (320) 632-0048, visit the store at 112 E. Broadway.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/28/former-sewing-shop-to-reopen-with-alterations/feed/ 0
Sports roundup: Day one of the individual state wrestling tournament http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/28/sports-roundup-day-one-of-the-individual-state-wrestling-tournament/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/28/sports-roundup-day-one-of-the-individual-state-wrestling-tournament/#comments Sat, 28 Feb 2015 15:37:44 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572040 Brandon Ortman of Pierz (120 pounds), Brad Kroll (160 pounds) and Kyle Lange  of Royalton-Upsala (182 pounds) all had pins in their opening round matches yesterday at the Xcel Energy Center. Zach Scott of Holdingford (132 pounds), Nate Brinker (195) and Kolton Eischens of Pierz (152) also won first round matches, but by decision. Kroll, Brinker, Eischens and Ortman also won their quarterfinals matches and will wrestle in the semifinals today. Lange and Scott lost and dropped into the consolation bracket. In that bracket, Lange fell in his first match to end his tournament, but Scott won and will continue today.

All three Little Falls wrestlers, Logan Kapphahn, Josh Beack and Axel Lange lost in opening round matches, and all three dropped into the consolation wrestlebacks. Beack and Kapphahn won last night to continue on, but Lange fell, and is now done.

The other wrestlers for Pierz: Reese Kapsner, Jake Andres, Andrew Tomala, Brett Kapsner and Austin Gall all lost opening round matches. The tournament ended for both Kapsners, Andres and Gall. Tomala advanced to wrestlebacks, but lost in the first match.

The rest of the Royalton-Upsala wrestlers, Jackson Held (126) and Clint Gadacz (285), lost in the first round. Gadacz’ tournament was done, and Held moved on to wrestlebacks, but lost in the first round.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/28/sports-roundup-day-one-of-the-individual-state-wrestling-tournament/feed/ 0
Your Year’s Money Checklist http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/your-years-money-checklist/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/your-years-money-checklist/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 21:30:23 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?guid=617b29f2f4208539c9a986a0c2c656c6 As winter fades, it’s time to seriously gear up to make your financial goals for 2015 real. They range from the simple and quick to the complex and long-term. Here’s a checklist to get you started and keep you going.

Pay yourself first. This concept, often pontificated, is relatively easy to understand and simple to implement. When you get paid, have a certain portion of your earnings (we recommend at least 10%) automatically deducted from your check and deposited into your 401(k), 403(b), 457 or other retirement plan at your work.

Contribute enough of a percentage to get your employer match. Your employer doesn’t offer a plan? Set up and automatically save to an individual retirement account. If you’re ambitious, you can actually contribute to both.

Pay down debt. Want a guaranteed rate of return? Simply pay off your debt early and you save yourself that interest rate tacked onto the balance, rather than paying it to the lender.

The type of debt matters. Some also argue whether to pay off a mortgage early; that choice is yours. Consider paying off consumer debt such as credit card balances and student and car loans as soon as possible.

Give yourself a raise. This probably isn’t too hard to do, especially since organizing documentation for tax time looms.

Go through your 2014 receipts and credit card and bank statements and look for purchases that were entirely discretionary that you didn’t need to buy. See which you may be able to eliminate for this year, such as excessively dining out or picking up an expensive coffee every day, to name just two.

Use the excess cash to fund your retirement plan and or pay down debt.

Check insurance. Prior to institution of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), which was billed as seeking to expand coverage and improve affordability of health-care coverage, nearly 32 million underinsured persons younger than 65 were in households spending a high share of income on medical care – as many as a third of residents in states like Idaho, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas. Nationally, more than half of people with low incomes and 20% of those with middle incomes were either underinsured or uninsured in recent years.

Some of these folks likely just can’t afford insurance; others are probably just negligent about their policies. Check your health-care as well as your auto, homeowners, life and other insurance to make sure you remain properly covered or even carry excess coverage such an umbrella policy.

Research ways to make coverage more affordable. Many times you can raise the deductibles on your auto and home policies or, if you drive an older car, remove comprehensive (which protects you from such mishaps as theft, natural disasters and vandalism) or collision to reduce premiums.

Do you qualify for more life insurance through work? Consider getting as much coverage from your employer as you can, including other available types of policies such as disability (in case you become unable to work). It’s cheap and generally requires no underwriting.

Get a financial checkup. Talk with a professional regarding your finances and see if he or she recommends ideas.

Invest in yourself. Read at least one personal finance book every few months, and build from there. Keep yourself informed and prepared to ask your advisor – not to mention yourself – about your financial situation.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Sterling Raskie, MSFS, MBA, CFP, is an independent, fee-only financial planner at Blankenship Financial Planning in New Berlin, Ill. He is an adjunct professor teaching courses in math, finance, insurance and investments. His blog is Getting Your Financial Ducks in a Row, where he writes regularly about investments, retirement savings and financial planning.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
As winter fades, it’s time to seriously gear up to make your financial goals for 2015 real. They range from the simple and quick to the complex and long-term. Here’s a checklist to get you started and keep you going.

Pay yourself first. This concept, often pontificated, is relatively easy to understand and simple to implement. When you get paid, have a certain portion of your earnings (we recommend at least 10%) automatically deducted from your check and deposited into your 401(k), 403(b), 457 or other retirement plan at your work.

Contribute enough of a percentage to get your employer match. Your employer doesn’t offer a plan? Set up and automatically save to an individual retirement account. If you’re ambitious, you can actually contribute to both.

Pay down debt. Want a guaranteed rate of return? Simply pay off your debt early and you save yourself that interest rate tacked onto the balance, rather than paying it to the lender.

The type of debt matters. Some also argue whether to pay off a mortgage early; that choice is yours. Consider paying off consumer debt such as credit card balances and student and car loans as soon as possible.

Give yourself a raise. This probably isn’t too hard to do, especially since organizing documentation for tax time looms.

Go through your 2014 receipts and credit card and bank statements and look for purchases that were entirely discretionary that you didn’t need to buy. See which you may be able to eliminate for this year, such as excessively dining out or picking up an expensive coffee every day, to name just two.

Use the excess cash to fund your retirement plan and or pay down debt.

Check insurance. Prior to institution of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), which was billed as seeking to expand coverage and improve affordability of health-care coverage, nearly 32 million underinsured persons younger than 65 were in households spending a high share of income on medical care – as many as a third of residents in states like Idaho, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico and Texas. Nationally, more than half of people with low incomes and 20% of those with middle incomes were either underinsured or uninsured in recent years.

Some of these folks likely just can’t afford insurance; others are probably just negligent about their policies. Check your health-care as well as your auto, homeowners, life and other insurance to make sure you remain properly covered or even carry excess coverage such an umbrella policy.

Research ways to make coverage more affordable. Many times you can raise the deductibles on your auto and home policies or, if you drive an older car, remove comprehensive (which protects you from such mishaps as theft, natural disasters and vandalism) or collision to reduce premiums.

Do you qualify for more life insurance through work? Consider getting as much coverage from your employer as you can, including other available types of policies such as disability (in case you become unable to work). It’s cheap and generally requires no underwriting.

Get a financial checkup. Talk with a professional regarding your finances and see if he or she recommends ideas.

Invest in yourself. Read at least one personal finance book every few months, and build from there. Keep yourself informed and prepared to ask your advisor – not to mention yourself – about your financial situation.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Sterling Raskie, MSFS, MBA, CFP, is an independent, fee-only financial planner at Blankenship Financial Planning in New Berlin, Ill. He is an adjunct professor teaching courses in math, finance, insurance and investments. His blog is Getting Your Financial Ducks in a Row, where he writes regularly about investments, retirement savings and financial planning.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/your-years-money-checklist/feed/ 0
Money Moves for Gen Y (pt. 2) http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/money-moves-for-gen-y-pt-2/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/money-moves-for-gen-y-pt-2/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 21:30:19 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?guid=6b56cc41a207868c738928c85c450b2f Our first article looked at how adults born between 1980 and 2000, Generation Y, must use more innovation, attention and creativity to build a financial future. Here are additional ideas.

Save your next windfall. This simple concept becomes hard when the check is in your hand. Yet rather than spend your next tax refund or salary bonus, deposit it into your emergency fund or your individual retirement account, converting temporary income into permanent savings.

Entertain yourself more simply. Entertainment likely constitutes the biggest black hole in the average household budget: $70 to $80 to take a family of four to the movies; $200 to attend a professional baseball game; $100 per ticket for the concert of a hot band or performer.

Look for attractions closer to home and more basic. Spend more time with family and (your more frugal) friends, take up hobbies such as reading and gardening or learn to window shop. Don’t completely swear off more pricey forms of entertainment, but keep them to a minimum.

Learn to cook. Picking up this domestic skill kills several financial birds with one stone:

  • You eat in more, which means you eat out less, saving a small fortune on restaurants.
  • You create another activity to occupy your time so you’re not out spending and filling the hours with high-priced entertainment.
  • You make hosting family and friends easier in your home, saving even more on entertainment.

Visualize being debt-free then write it down. This entirely mental activity can pack a punch. Imagine how freedom from debt will feel, particularly the absence of stress in combination with greater freedom. That gives you something real to aim for. Refer to what you write down as frequently as necessary.

Keep your clunker another year. Most people want a new car, but don’t necessarily need one. Unless your car is certified for the scrapheap, keep it: one more year without a car payment, one more year to save money for a larger down payment (and lower monthly payment) on your next vehicle.

Brainstorm with someone whose financial goals resemble yours. If you establish money goals different from what you had, you need company to help stay on track. Find someone with similar goals and regularly – try for at least monthly – brainstorm various ways to make your plans work.

Start exercising. Spending money sometimes substitutes for more productive pastimes. If you start a regular exercise program, you’ll probably find that you feel better about yourself and will have less time – or need – to spend. You also improve your health and become less dependent on costly medical care.

Spend less than you earn. No progress is possible unless you arrange your budget to squeeze out extra money each month: the source of capital you’ll use to increase savings and investments and pay off debt.

Get serious about your emergency fund. Your retirement fund is not for emergencies and credit lines only lead you deeper into debt (which in turn sets up your next money emergency). Pump even more into your pot meant to cover six months’ expenses and, once you have the fund, tap it for legitimate emergencies only.

Lighten up TV time. How does your watching television affect your finances? Maybe everything: A major purpose of TV is advertising; advertising gets you to buy things. The less time you watch TV, likely the less money you spend.

Buy big through craigslist. Your nearest box store is quick, hassle-free – and expensive. Before you buy anything big brand-new, check what’s for sale on craigslist or a similar site that offers many items at a fraction of retail prices. You may not be able to cut spending on every major purchase this way, but just a few can save you a lot.

Release past sins. Do you agonize over your financial mistakes? The failed business, previous bankruptcy or the bygone job with the salary you never made again? Move forward and create the best life possible – a harder task if you still ruminate over mistakes you made years ago.

Shop without credit cards. Use your debit card for routine shopping and save credit cards for when absolutely necessary, like when you need travel insurance on airline tickets or a buyer’s protection plan on a major item. This keeps your card balances from ballooning after impulse buys.

Earn extra cash via the Web. Multiple income streams become more important as job security generally continues to fade in our economy. One of the best places to begin making extra money: the Internet.

In addition to managing social media freelance for other sites and companies, you can use the Web to find and market your own services, from dog walking to selling your own handmade crafts.

Learn at least one new work-related skill. List the skills that might make you more valuable to your employer or to a future employer. Choose one that is most valuable or easiest for you now and begin work to master it. Do this every year from now on.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Jeff Rose, CFP, is the founder of Alliance Wealth Management in Carbondale, Ill., and also is the founder of the website Good Financial Cents and Life Insurance by Jeff.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
Our first article looked at how adults born between 1980 and 2000, Generation Y, must use more innovation, attention and creativity to build a financial future. Here are additional ideas.

Save your next windfall. This simple concept becomes hard when the check is in your hand. Yet rather than spend your next tax refund or salary bonus, deposit it into your emergency fund or your individual retirement account, converting temporary income into permanent savings.

Entertain yourself more simply. Entertainment likely constitutes the biggest black hole in the average household budget: $70 to $80 to take a family of four to the movies; $200 to attend a professional baseball game; $100 per ticket for the concert of a hot band or performer.

Look for attractions closer to home and more basic. Spend more time with family and (your more frugal) friends, take up hobbies such as reading and gardening or learn to window shop. Don’t completely swear off more pricey forms of entertainment, but keep them to a minimum.

Learn to cook. Picking up this domestic skill kills several financial birds with one stone:

  • You eat in more, which means you eat out less, saving a small fortune on restaurants.
  • You create another activity to occupy your time so you’re not out spending and filling the hours with high-priced entertainment.
  • You make hosting family and friends easier in your home, saving even more on entertainment.

Visualize being debt-free then write it down. This entirely mental activity can pack a punch. Imagine how freedom from debt will feel, particularly the absence of stress in combination with greater freedom. That gives you something real to aim for. Refer to what you write down as frequently as necessary.

Keep your clunker another year. Most people want a new car, but don’t necessarily need one. Unless your car is certified for the scrapheap, keep it: one more year without a car payment, one more year to save money for a larger down payment (and lower monthly payment) on your next vehicle.

Brainstorm with someone whose financial goals resemble yours. If you establish money goals different from what you had, you need company to help stay on track. Find someone with similar goals and regularly – try for at least monthly – brainstorm various ways to make your plans work.

Start exercising. Spending money sometimes substitutes for more productive pastimes. If you start a regular exercise program, you’ll probably find that you feel better about yourself and will have less time – or need – to spend. You also improve your health and become less dependent on costly medical care.

Spend less than you earn. No progress is possible unless you arrange your budget to squeeze out extra money each month: the source of capital you’ll use to increase savings and investments and pay off debt.

Get serious about your emergency fund. Your retirement fund is not for emergencies and credit lines only lead you deeper into debt (which in turn sets up your next money emergency). Pump even more into your pot meant to cover six months’ expenses and, once you have the fund, tap it for legitimate emergencies only.

Lighten up TV time. How does your watching television affect your finances? Maybe everything: A major purpose of TV is advertising; advertising gets you to buy things. The less time you watch TV, likely the less money you spend.

Buy big through craigslist. Your nearest box store is quick, hassle-free – and expensive. Before you buy anything big brand-new, check what’s for sale on craigslist or a similar site that offers many items at a fraction of retail prices. You may not be able to cut spending on every major purchase this way, but just a few can save you a lot.

Release past sins. Do you agonize over your financial mistakes? The failed business, previous bankruptcy or the bygone job with the salary you never made again? Move forward and create the best life possible – a harder task if you still ruminate over mistakes you made years ago.

Shop without credit cards. Use your debit card for routine shopping and save credit cards for when absolutely necessary, like when you need travel insurance on airline tickets or a buyer’s protection plan on a major item. This keeps your card balances from ballooning after impulse buys.

Earn extra cash via the Web. Multiple income streams become more important as job security generally continues to fade in our economy. One of the best places to begin making extra money: the Internet.

In addition to managing social media freelance for other sites and companies, you can use the Web to find and market your own services, from dog walking to selling your own handmade crafts.

Learn at least one new work-related skill. List the skills that might make you more valuable to your employer or to a future employer. Choose one that is most valuable or easiest for you now and begin work to master it. Do this every year from now on.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Jeff Rose, CFP, is the founder of Alliance Wealth Management in Carbondale, Ill., and also is the founder of the website Good Financial Cents and Life Insurance by Jeff.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/money-moves-for-gen-y-pt-2/feed/ 0
Royalton season ends http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/royalton-season-ends/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/royalton-season-ends/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 18:12:46 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571952 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Royalton boys basketball concluded its season with a South Sub-Section 5A play-in loss, Monday.
The Royals, the No. 9 seed, lost to eighth-seeded Ogilvie, 48-39.
Shane Vannurden led the Royals with 12 points in the loss, and the Royals trailed 24-18 at halftime, and never got any closer than that in the second half.
Royalton also lost 56-36, Feb. 20 against St. John’s Prep in the regular season finale.
The Royals concluded the season with a 2-23 overall record.
They lose seniors Nick Popp and Matt Fountain.

Swanville/Upsala end regular season
The Swanville Bulldogs ended their regular season in boys basketball with a 78-53 win over Browerville, Feb. 20.
Swanville also beat Verndale 65-44, Feb. 19 to finish the regular season with a 14-9 overall record.
Upsala, 12-13 overall, closed out its regular season with a 66-63 loss to Osakis, Feb. 20. The loss put them into a five-game losing skid entering the playoffs.
Both Upsala and Swanville competed in the South Sub-Section 5A tournament quarterfinals, Thursday, but results were unavailable by press time.
No. 2 seed Swanville played the seventh-seed, Onamia. Upsala, the No. 3 seed, played sixth-seeded Isle.
If the two teams won, they would have played each other, Saturday in Little Falls, but results from that were also unavailable.
The winner of that game would play in the sub-section final, Tuesday, also in Little Falls.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/royalton-season-ends/feed/ 0
Christ is the answer! http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/christ-is-the-answer/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/christ-is-the-answer/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:41:44 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572030 By Frank Rebnord, In His Service Ministries, Little Falls

Today is the celebration of the second Sunday of Lent. During this point in the year we begin to see that it ultimately is leading up  to the crucifixion of our Lord Jesus Christ and his resurrection.

In March 8:31 we see that  Jesus was very open with his disciples that his life was coming near an end. We are told that his rejection would come from the religious leadership of the Jews. But his disciples were reassured not to worry as Jesus would arise to live once again after three days.

We as Christians today understand and see what God’s great plan was but Peter was angry and pulled Jesus aside so he could speak to him. Peter basically insisted that this could not be true and should not happen to Jesus. We know Christ has some pretty harsh words for Peter in verse 33 as he was told to “get behind me Satan.” Christ knew Peter’s heart and it was not in line with God’s plan.

Many of us today would probably take the same stand if we were there with Jesus but again it would not have been in God’s plan but only our plan.

During this time of Lent we need to remember the message the Prophet Isaiah gave us that the Messiah would have to suffer great things. Isaiah 53:4-6: “Surely our griefs he himself bore, and our sorrows he carried; yet we ourselves esteemed him stricken, smitten of God and afflicted. (5) But he was pierced through for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the chastening for our well-being fell upon him, and by his scourging we are healed. (6) All of us like sheep have gone astray, each of has turned to his own way; but the Lord has caused the inquity of us to fall on him.”

So as much as Peter was excited about knowing the Messiah, as a man, he did not want him to suffer death but yes as we just read it was prophesized by Isaiah. They learned and we now know that without the sacrifice of Jesus our sins would never be washed away.

We don’t want to repeat the same mistake that Peter did. We know that Jesus is our Messiah and that he had to die for the remission of our sins. By this a price was paid that we could have not paid; only a cost paid by God by the sacrifice of His Son.

Christ on the cross seemed then as it does now to be evil by some but what followed is important to remember. It is Jesus’ resurrection from the dead that makes the difference. It did not end at the cross but it is only where our faith begins.

The disciples and Satan did not want Jesus to die on the cross but for very different reasons. The disciples loved Jesus and did not want to lose a friend and Satan saw Christ as his enemy and wanted Jesus to die. God had a very different plan and it was that God wanted and gained the victory over sin once and for all.

At this point in time His disciples discovered the purpose for Jesus to die and celebrated this victory.

A picture of this victory that was seen by His followers was to deny themselves and take up their own cross, whatever that may be, thereby being the example of Jesus’ victory to the world. They were not defeated then and neither are we today.

The wealth they gained as disciples then and us now, is not financial, as we are told that it profits a man nothing if in the end man loses his soul. So the value is not money but our mortal souls.

The verse that struck me the hardest in preparing this message was found in March 8 verse 38 — “ For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when he comes in the glory of his father with the holy angels.

May we always be ready to be a spokesperson (witness) for Jesus not matter what the cost. Instead, look forward to when Jesus will come again in the glory of his father with the holy angels. This is based on Mark 8:31-38 NASB.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/christ-is-the-answer/feed/ 0
Thomas Bell named February’s LFCHS Boy of the Month http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/thomas-bell-named-februarys-lfchs-boy-of-the-month/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/thomas-bell-named-februarys-lfchs-boy-of-the-month/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:37:52 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572024 The Little Falls Exchange has chosen Thomas Bell, son of Julie and Steve Bell, as the Little Falls Community High School (LFCHS) Student of the Month for February.

Thomas Bell

Thomas Bell

Teacher Sara Pohlman summed up why Thomas was selected as the February Boy of the Month.

“As Thomas’s adviser and supporter of his athletic activities for the past four years, I have witnessed his compassion, hard work and dedication to others both in the classroom setting and his sporting events,” Pohlman said. “Thomas is a natural leader who serves as a role model for underclassmen. He performs well in the classroom and strives to do his best, giving 100 percent on a daily basis.

“Thomas has been described as having a compassionate heart, overall good humanitarianism, good natured, honest and a heartwarming demeanor,” Pohlman said.

Bell has earned a grade point average of 3.623 and has found time after his studies to be very active during his high school career. He has been involved in band, Flyer Christian Athletes (FCA), Flyer Athletes Leadership Council (FALC) and principal assistant.

Sports didn’t take a back seat for Bell, as he has been a four-sport athlete. He has participated in football, basketball and baseball, earning an All-Conference in baseball. The fourth team sport he has participated in is soccer. In soccer, Bell was selected as All-Area Soccer Team, All-Conference, Team MVP and All-State.

Teacher Mike Huck has known Bell for the last four years and said he has been very impressed not only with his school work but attitude and personality.

“As a teacher, to see a student enter high school, grow to become as adult as they can be and still be a high school student, this is one of the things that makes teaching rewarding,” said Huck. “He has made the four-year transition and is just as kind and personable as he possibly could be.”

In addition to his school work and sports, Bell has been involved with a mission trip to Guatemala, Toys for Tots and his church. He has taken time to rake lawns and play bingo at Falls Manor with residents.

In his free time, Bell enjoys running, woodworking  and spending time with his nephews.

This fall, Bell plans to attend St. John’s University to major in biology, with plans to follow in his mother’s footsteps in becoming a doctor. Bell has also been invited to try out for St. John’s soccer team.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/thomas-bell-named-februarys-lfchs-boy-of-the-month/feed/ 0
Staff proposes onsite day care to Upsala School Board http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/staff-proposes-onsite-day-care-to-upsala-school-board/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/staff-proposes-onsite-day-care-to-upsala-school-board/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:36:09 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572020 By Liz Verley, Staff Writer

Upsala teachers Lindsay Bergmann and Leah Merten presented a proposal to the Upsala School Board asking for a day care for staff members.

They explained Wednesday, that the day care would be self-insured and be a non-

profit incorporation, run by a board of teachers/staff.

“The day care will contract out with a care provider who will also carry their own insurance,” said Bergmann. “It will be licensed through the county rather than the state, which will allow for less rooms and needed staff.”

Merten and Bergmann gave both pros and con to be considered.

The onsite day care would eliminate day care issues for some staff such as:

• When day care providers take vacation days or are sick and no backup can be arranged;

• When day cares in Upsala are full and staff must bring their children to day cares in other towns;

• Staff will not have to pay for day care when their children are home over the summer break and holidays; and

• Pick-ups and drop-offs at other day cares will be eliminated for some staff making morning meetings less difficult to make.

“With the number of teachers retiring in the next few years, Upsala School will need to bring in new teachers. An onsite day care is a perk that will be a great recruiting tool,” Bergmann said. “Many of the young staff that have left us in the last few years have had young children or are currently having them. This may have been a perk that would have kept them here.”

She said, “Some of our staff have infants or are expecting them soon. By having the day care onsite, this will allow the staff member to nurse on their lunch break, bond with their babies, and as a result have happier babies and happier staff.”

If implemented, the day care would create at least one new job in the community and if it grew, possibly more. It was expected that if it was available by the next school year there would be eight to 10 using the service.

It would be be expected that there could be a relationship between the day care and the early childhood development class .

Cons listed included:

• Having an onsite staff day care would take a few children away from a few day care in Upsala.

“However,” said Bergmann, “Some of those day cares have a long waiting list, so they will fill up again quickly;” and

• The day care would be using school resources such as heat, electricity and space for free.

“However according yo the Upsala Area School Community use of facilities policy, Class 2 groups are permitted the use of the facilities for free during regular hours when custodians are on duty,” said Bergmann. “The day care would be run during regular custodial hours. Also, the lights and heat are on throughout the building regardless of who is using the rooms, so the added electricity would be nominal.”

Noting that there is a lot of paperwork needed in this process those giving the presentation urged the Board to make an early decision.

Dean of Students Vern Capelle will work with the group and bring a recommendation back to a future board meeting for consideration.

Upsala School Board Briefs

Other business that came before the Upsala School Board included:

•Directing administration to gather input from coaches on what their feelings are on pairing sports with Swanville;

•Accepting a donation of $200 from Lange Oil;

•Approving a one year contract for three hours a day with Dave Piasecki as a part-time adjunct college professor at $15,000 with no seniority or benefits;

•Approving a contract for Kerry Osberg as a long term sub for K-12 art;

•Approving a contract for Marsha Krebs as a paraprofessional;

•Approving the resignation of Brittany Harren as a special ed paraprofessional;

•Approving the teachers seniority list; and

•Approving the spring coaching list.

The next regular meeting of the Upsala school Board will be March 25.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/staff-proposes-onsite-day-care-to-upsala-school-board/feed/ 0
Fundraisers to benefit technology at Upsala Schools http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/fundraisers-to-benefit-technology-at-upsala-schools/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/fundraisers-to-benefit-technology-at-upsala-schools/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:35:03 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572016 By Liz Verley, Staff Writer

Funds from the Chip Shoppe campaign going on right now through March 10 at the Upsala School will be used to improve technology, according to a presentation to the Upsala School Board, Wednesday.

“The funds raised by Chip Shoppe, the planned Color Run and possibly a carnival would raise some of the funds needed to put smart boards in the classroom that do not presently have them, provide a cart of 30 mini iPads and a cart of 30 chrome books for the elementary school,” said Elementary Teacher Desiree Bengtson.

It was noted that at the present time the school is using 30 old computers that can no longer be repaired. Teachers have only one to three mini iPads per classroom and only grades 3 – 6 have smart boards.

Bengtson asked the Board to try and find money in the budget to help support technology. The Board agreed to review the request when working on the upcoming budget.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/fundraisers-to-benefit-technology-at-upsala-schools/feed/ 0
Tenold and Quillo awarded 2015 music scholarships http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/tenold-and-quillo-awarded-2015-music-scholarships-2/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/tenold-and-quillo-awarded-2015-music-scholarships-2/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:34:17 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572014 St. Francis Music Center, Little Falls, has chosen Valerie Tenold and Chanin Andrés Quillo as the recipients of the 2015 Sister Justina Bieganek Music scholarships. The scholarship was established in 2004 by family members, friends, and fans of Sister Justina in honor of her 75th anniversary as a Franciscan Sister. She worked at St. Francis Music Center since its start in 1979. She passed away at the age of 100, but is remembered with love and respect by the students, staff and faculty.

Tenold, the daughter of Ryan and Trish Tenold of Little Falls, has studied violin at the Music Center for the past 1½ years and also plays in the St. Francis Preparatory Orchestra. She is in second grade at Mary of Lourdes School. Her future plans include continuing to play violin. Her violin teacher at St. Francis Music Center is Bobbi French.

Quillo is the son of Lalo and Elizabeth Quillo of Long Prairie. He is in sixth grade at St. Mary of Mt. Carmel School in Long Prairie. He has played cello for six years and participates in the orchestras at the Music Center. He studies cello at the Music Center with Jenna Miller.

The students were chosen for this award, which is the highest scholarship honor awarded at the Music Center, based on their many musical achievements, and also for their love of music and for the hours that they dedicate to practicing.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/tenold-and-quillo-awarded-2015-music-scholarships-2/feed/ 0
LaForce is LFCHS Girl of the Month for February http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/laforce-is-lfchs-girl-of-the-month-for-february/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/laforce-is-lfchs-girl-of-the-month-for-february/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:32:13 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572008 Little Falls Community High School (LFCHS) announced that Rachel LaForce has been chosen the February Girl of the Month. She is the daughter of Joe and Dee LaForce.

Rachel LaForce

Rachel LaForce

LaForce is busy with all of the different activities she participates in.

She has  participated in cross country all four years of high school. She was named to the Academic All-Conference in her senior year,  has been active with the Knowledge Bowl all four years, was named the secretary/treasurer and was a state participant in Knowledge Bowl.

LaForce has participated in the Lunch with the Stars for three years. The Link Crew has taken up time in her junior and senior years of high school and she has belonged to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes for three years.

Lyn Gwost, English teacher, said, “Whether sitting in a desk in my classroom, crossing my path in the hallway or standing behind a cash register as I pay for my groceries, Rachel LaForce is a delightful young lady with a ready smile and a positive attitude, so her selection as February Girl of the Month comes as no surprise. I have had the pleasure of teaching Rachel in introduction to college literature during her junior year and college composition I and II during the current school year, and I have found her to be the epitome of the model student. I appreciate Rachel’s regular contributions to class discussion and love how she embraces peer interaction as an opportunity to grow. To put it quite simply, Rachel loves to learn. I am certain Rachel will make great contributions to her college classroom and campus in the fall of 2015; I am equally certain she will be smiling and loving life in the process.”

LaForce has participated in the musical for two years. She has served on committees for winter week and the mock car crash and has also attended the Link Kindness Retreat. She was selected to be in the National Honor Society.

Tom Stockard, social teacher, said, “Honoring a student of Rachel LaForce’s ability is a privilege and a testament to the quality of individuals that attend LFCHS. Ms. LaForce is a unique student who possesses impeccable patience, perseverance and intelligence. Her commitment to excellence is second to none and her level of responsibility and maturity is unprecedented.” Stockard said, “Devotion to her school and community is characterized by her participation in countless events. Whether she is organizing the mock car crash, volunteering at St. Otto’s, performing in the spring musical, or serving as the captain of the cross country team, Rachel is dedicated to improving herself and general welfare of those in her company. She truly is a force in and out of the classroom.”

Stockard also noted LaForce is “Blessed with a quiet sense of humor and gentle kindness that represent her respect for her peers and others.”

LaForce has been active in her church, as a lector, a Eucharistic Minister and in a Sunday hospitality group. She has been a volunteer at the Harmony House and St. Otto’s.

In her spare time, LaForce enjoys reading, running, listening to music and spending time with friends and family.

LaForce is undecided as to what college she will attend, but does plan to get a degree in English education.

Alpha Delta Kappa, The Dandelions and PEO, chapters BB and EO, sponsor the Girl of the Month.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/laforce-is-lfchs-girl-of-the-month-for-february/feed/ 0
Motley residences damaged by ice heaves on Shamineau Lake http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/motley-residences-damaged-by-ice-heaves-on-shamineau-lake/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/motley-residences-damaged-by-ice-heaves-on-shamineau-lake/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:30:28 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571962 By Gabby LandsverkStaff Writer

 

IceHeave

Ices heaves on the shore of Shamineau Lake. Photo courtesy of the Staples World.

 

On February 7, Patrick Held was minding his own business in his home near the shore of Shamineau Lake in Motley when the foundation of his home suddenly moved.

“All of a sudden, I heard a loud bang,” Held said.

He went down the basement to find the wall had shifted 3 inches, all because of the lake ice.

The damage to Held’s home, along with other residences in the area, was caused by a phenomenon called “ice heaving” or “ice jacking,” Held said. He explained that this occurs when lake ice becomes thick enough to put significant pressure on the water table, which in turn puts pressure on the shore, pushing it up the way a jack lifts a car.

“The shore level is raised quite substantially,” Held said.

On Held’s property, the rising earth had pushed the retaining wall into the basement wall, causing it and the foundation of the house to move.

Although the lake ice has been known to heave before, this year has been worse than ever due to the high water level.

“24 years of living here and that’s never happened on this side of the lake,” Held said.

He added that at least one of his neighbors also had property damaged by the ice heaves.

There are ways to prevent ice heaving, Held said, including a process called “aeration,” which pumps air through pipes into the lake water to prevent ice. This can prevent pressure from building and prevent damage, Held said.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/motley-residences-damaged-by-ice-heaves-on-shamineau-lake/feed/ 0
Chamber honors Businesses and Volunteer of the Year http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/chamber-honors-businesses-and-volunteer-of-the-year/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/chamber-honors-businesses-and-volunteer-of-the-year/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:30:08 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=572003 Chamber-Tri-City-PavingChamber-Falls-Floral

 

 

 

 

 

 

At its annual meeting Thursday, the Large and Small Businesses and Volunteer of the Year were honored by the Little Falls Area Chamber of Commerce. Pictured above at left is Chamber President/CEO Deb Boelz presenting the Large Business of the Year Award to Jack, left, and Adam Surma, owners of Tri-City Paving. Above right is Boelz presenting the Small Business of the Year Award to Falls Floral owners Dale, left, and Jan Lust.

Chamber-Shane-ColeAt lower left, Volunteer of the Year Shane Cole, left, accepts his award from Boelz. The annual meeting is a celebration of the successes of Chamber members.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/chamber-honors-businesses-and-volunteer-of-the-year/feed/ 0
Pierz girls heat up at right time of season http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/pierz-girls-heat-up-at-right-time-of-season/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/pierz-girls-heat-up-at-right-time-of-season/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 17:10:13 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571949 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Pierz is officially on a winning streak after dominating Pillager 68-33 for their third win in as many games, Tuesday.

(3115sportsCarter)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Pierz senior Kayla Carter goes up strong to the hoop, Feb. 19 against Maple Lake.

(3115sportsCarter) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Pierz senior Kayla Carter goes up strong to the hoop, Feb. 19 against Maple Lake.

The Pioneers also beat Maple Lake 59-50, Feb. 19, and had beaten Holdingford Feb. 17, which gave them the first such streak of the season.
In the game against the Irish, the Pioneers used their home crowd, and their inside game to take down Maple Lake.
Senior Kayla Carter had a game-high 21 points, and also grabbed six boards in the win. Kendra Fischer, her post partner in crime, scored 13 points and nabbed five rebounds.
Carter was at it again, Tuesday, when she scored 23 points to lead the Pioneers to a crushing 35-point defeat of Pillager.
Shelbie Boser added nine points, as Pierz cruised from early on, leading 37-13 at half.
Pierz closed the regular season with a game at Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa (BBE), Friday, but results were unavailable by press time.

Holdingford loses 15 straight
It has been a tough season for Holdingford, and two more losses, one to BBE and another to Sauk Centre, added to that, as the regular season winds down.
The Huskers fell 49-34 to BBE, Feb. 20.
Rachel Hellmann had six points and eight rebounds to lead Holdingford in the loss.
Sauk Centre sent the Huskers home with a 68-19 loss, the 15th in a row for Holdingford.
Kailee Heinen scored nearly half of the Huskers points with nine.
The Huskers, 2-21, closed the regular season with a game against Pillager, Thursday, and against Eden Valley-Watkins, Friday. Results were unavailable by press time.
The 6AA sub-section playoffs begin for Pierz and Holdingford with the quarterfinals, Thursday, but seeds and match-ups have yet to be determined.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/pierz-girls-heat-up-at-right-time-of-season/feed/ 0
Record numbers of juniors, seniors earn college credit in high school http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/record-numbers-of-juniors-seniors-earn-college-credit-in-high-school/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/record-numbers-of-juniors-seniors-earn-college-credit-in-high-school/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:47:25 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571972 Families save thousands as students get a head start in college

By Gabby LandsverkStaff Writer

Between 40–60 percent of Morrison County students are taking advantage of opportunities to earn college credit while still in high school through programs like College in the Schools (CIS), Instructional Television (ITV) and Post Secondary Enrollment Option (PSEO), according to school officials.

“The number of students taking college credit is pretty significant,” said Pierz Supt. George Weber.

Pierz High School Principal Karrie Boser said the district consistently has 40-50 percent or more of juniors and seniors taking at least one college credit. For the 2013-14 school year, 114 students, or 64 percent of approximately 178 juniors and seniors, were enrolled in one or more college courses.

Pierz, as well as some other schools in Morrison County, offers students the opportunity to graduate not only with a high school diploma, but a complete two-year Associate of Arts (AA) college degree as well.

Boser said this year the number of students pursuing associate degrees is higher than ever.

She said out of a total of 95 juniors and seniors, nine students are scheduled to earn an AA degree, and four more are taking PSEO full-time and could potentially get a two-year degree.

Little Falls Community High School (LFCHS) Principal Tim Bjorge said 59 percent of seniors and 50 percent of juniors in the district will earn at least some college credit before graduating.

Bjorge said LFCHS offers a total of 70 college credits to high school students through 16 different courses, but lacks certain courses required for students to earn an AA degree.

In Swanville, High School Principal Sheryl Johnson said 25 students, or 58 percent of juniors and seniors, are taking at least one college credit this year. She said it’s not unusual for students to get a head start on their college degree by earning as much as a year’s worth of credits.

“They could for sure walk out on graduation day with a full year of college under their belt,” Johnson said.

Jonathan Young, counselor at Long Prairie-Grey Eagle High School, said 11 students are planning to graduate this year with an AA degree. Since the opportunity to earn a two-year degree was made available in 2010, 57 students have graduated with AAs, Young said.

In addition, he said, 70 students, or 53 percent of juniors and seniors, are earning college credit in some capacity this year.

Royalton High School Counselor Monica Flakus said that, although the district doesn’t have the option for students to earn an AA, 44 percent of Royalton seniors, 30 percent of juniors and 13 percent of sophomores are earning college credit this year.

Of those, Flakus said, five are taking the courses either online or on a college campus.

Options for taking college credit vary between school districts. A common program is CIS, run by the University of Minnesota classes which offers college-level courses taught by specially-certified high school teachers.

A high-tech course option for students is ITV courses, which are taught long-distance through live or recorded video. Students can interact with each other, and with the instructor, through live online chat rooms and email.

Less commonly, students can also take college classes right from the source either on-campus or online through PSEO.

A few students even opt for a full schedule of college-only courses, although most students take some combination of CIS, ITV, PSEO and high school classes.

School officials said districts in Morrison County work with a number of colleges and universities, most commonly St. Cloud State, St. Cloud Tech and Central Lakes College.

“It’s a great partnership we have with the institutions we work with,” Boser said.

School officials agreed that no matter how the students earn college credit, the chance to get a head start on higher education provides big benefits.

A major factor is the increasingly high cost of earning a degree; students who earn college credit in high school will have fewer courses to take (and pay for) once they get to college.

“A huge advantage is the cost savings,” Boser said.

CIS and ITV programs allow students to earn free college credit, and PSEO students get their courses, as well as textbooks, at no cost.

“It’s basically free money for them to get college credit,” Flakus said.

Bjorge said that during the 2013-14 school year, LFCHS students taking CIS courses saved over $250,000 in tuition costs

The free courses also give students a chance to explore several areas of study without having to worry about committing to a major right away.

“It’s a fairly safe way for students to dip their toes into the college pool,” Johnson said. “They can ease their way in and decide ‘Is college for me?’”

Johnson said for a small district like Swanville, college credit options give students a chance to take electives and other classes that wouldn’t otherwise be available.

Swanville senior Ashlie Kaun said that taking CIS classes has left her better equipped to handle higher education.

“It’s prepared me a lot for college,” Kaun said. “I know the challenges I’ll face.”

Annie Browen, also a senior at Swanville, said taking college classes gave her a better understanding of what she was interested in doing after high school.

“I found something I really, really like,” Browen said.

Taking a college course can help students assess not only their interests, but also their ability to be responsible and manage their time, giving them an early chance to practice the independence and initiative that college classes require.

“A big benefit is preparing the kids for the rigors of college,” Young said. “It’s a challenge and requires study habits and skills that students learn along the way.”

Boser said the high numbers of participation in CIS, ITV and PSEO options reflect well on the quality and dedication of area students.

“It says a lot for your students because it’s not easy,” she said.

Browen said taking the higher-level courses made college more accessible not just financially, but mentally.

“It’s hard, but it’s worth it,” she said. “You’re realizing … ‘I can do this.’ It takes away that fear.”

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/record-numbers-of-juniors-seniors-earn-college-credit-in-high-school/feed/ 0
MN House passes Kresha’s child protection bill 130–0 http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/mn-house-passes-kreshas-child-protection-bill-130-0/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/mn-house-passes-kreshas-child-protection-bill-130-0/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:39:48 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571855 By Gabby LandsverkStaff Writer

The Minnesota House of Representatives recently passed House File 0008, chiefly authored by Rep. Ron Kresha, R-Little Falls, to update child protection provisions. In calling on fellow representatives to vote in favor of the bill, Kresha described the “knock on the door” experienced by the 25,297 Minnesota families who were visited by child protection services in 2013.

“I ask you to answer that knock on the door,” Kresha said.

The bill amends Minnesota Statutes regarding public policy in child protection cases, adding language which emphasizes that “the health and safety of children shall be of paramount concern” to ensure that actions in potential cases of child abuse prioritize the safety of the children involved.

“Child safety is first and foremost when allegations occur,” Kresha said.

An additional change included in the bill is the removal of language which prevented the reexamination or use of reports that have been “screened-out,” or judged to not require invention.

Under the new provisions, social workers can re-visit previously screened-out reports to investigate cases and/or help make a determination on current allegations.

Rep. Joe Mullery, DFL-Minneapolis, spoke in favor of the bill, saying that it had encountered no opposition at any of the hearings at which it was presented, and that it had been presented at more hearings than any bill he had ever seen in his years as a member of the House. Mullery added that it was also unanimously supported by representatives from the Governor’s Task Force for the Protection of Children.

Rep. Ryan Winkler, DFL-Golden Valley expressed a concern that the bill was too small in scope and therefore in danger of turning into a mere talking point, distracting from work toward more challenging or expensive changes.

Kresha responded that he intended House File 0008 to be a small step in the larger, long-term process of reformed child protection in Minnesota.

“I will admit that there is a lot of work to do,” Kresha said. “We need to push everywhere we can to get some of this stuff done.”

The final vote was 130–0 in favor of passing the bill. Four members of the House were absent and did not vote.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/mn-house-passes-kreshas-child-protection-bill-130-0/feed/ 0
Holdingford, Pierz fall twice to end regular season http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/holdingford-pierz-fall-twice-to-end-regular-season/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/holdingford-pierz-fall-twice-to-end-regular-season/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:09:12 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571947 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Both Pierz and Holdingford ended their regular seasons with a pair of losses.
The Pioneers fell to 24-1 Maple Lake, 84-58, Feb. 19.
The Irish scored as many points in the first half as the Pioneers did all game, leading 58-38 at halftime.
Nick Herold finished with 14 points to lead the Pioneers. Aaron Weber (13) and Robbie Skiba (10) were also in double figures.
Pierz lost in a much different fashion, Monday against Braham.
The Pioneers trailed 42-34 at the half the Bombers, but stormed back.
Braham held off the Pioneers for a 78-75 win.
Weber had 24 points to lead the Pioneers. Noah Boser was 5-for-7 from beyond the arc, and finished with 16 points. Herold added 14 points, and Skiba had 11 points and 11 rebounds.
Pierz, who finished the regular season at 13-13 overall, kicked off the sub-section 6AA playoffs as the four seed at home against fifth-seeded Staples-Motley.
Holdingford too lost its final two regular season games.
The Huskers fell 59-43 to Kimball, Feb. 19.
Sophomore Blake Patrick led the Huskers with 12 points.
Grant Bullert had eight points to lead Holdingford in a 66-30 season finale loss to Sauk Centre.
The Mainstreeters ran away with the game early, and led 35-19 at halftime.
Holdingford, 6-18 overall, earned the No. 6 seed played at No. 3 seed Long Prairie-Grey Eagle in the quarterfinals, Thursday.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/holdingford-pierz-fall-twice-to-end-regular-season/feed/ 0
Higher Estate Taxes: Bad Idea http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/higher-estate-taxes-bad-idea/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/higher-estate-taxes-bad-idea/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:30:03 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?guid=166e080a538263d9ac8752407ec3536e Boosting the tax on inherited wealth is a perennial goal of some politicians. And while the White House’s latest plan to boost the levy on estates faces a dim future in a GOP-controlled Congress, the concept will continue to pop up. There’s a lot wrong with this idea.

President Barack Obama’s budget wants to see an increase in the rate of what some call the death tax from 40% to nearly 60%, when you apply his proposed higher capital gains tax of 28% to what’s left after paying the death levy.

Under current law, when you inherit an asset and wish to sell it, you figure out what’s called your basis. When your parents, or whoever bequeathed you the asset, were alive, the basis was what they originally paid for it. If you inherit your parents’ home, you can bet it’s worth more upon their death than they paid for it. For you as the heir, current law says the basis rises to the property’s fair market value – what it would sell for today.

But under the new proposal, when you inherit an asset, your basis will simply be the decedent's original basis.

Example: Dad buys a house for $10,000. He dies and leaves it to you. The fair market value on the date of death is $100,000, which is the new basis. You sell it for $120,000. Under current law, you have a capital gain of $20,000 (sales price of $120,000 less step-up in basis of $100,000).

Under the Obama plan, you have a capital gain of $110,000 (sales price of $120,000 less original basis of $10,000). If you live in a state with high property values, this could result a substantial tax burden. In California, a state with very high home prices, the average beneficiary would probably be forced to sell their parents' home just to pay the taxes due.

I believe this proposal has very little chance of becoming law. Change that to I hope this proposal has very little chance of becoming law.

The Obama plan contains exemptions for some households, but an enormous number of people still would get slammed. The whole reason we have step-up in basis is because we have a death tax. If assets are liable for tax when Dad owned them, it’s unfair to treat them as liable for tax again when the inheritor sells it. This adds yet another redundant layer of tax on savings and investment. It's a huge tax hike on family farms and small businesses.

This is like a second tax. The first one has a top tax rate of 40% and a standard deduction of $5.3 million ($10.6 million for surviving spouses). Conceivably, an accumulated capital gain could face a 40% death tax levy and then a 28% capital gains tax on what is left. That equals an integrated federal tax of just under 60% on inherited capital gains.

Note that Dad’s original purchase of stocks, bonds and property with after-tax dollars. In other words, Dad earned money and paid taxes on those earnings. With the money he had, after he paid Uncle Sam, he (and perhaps Mom) bought the asset the beneficiary now must pay taxes upon Dad’s death. I know, it’s capital gain taxes. However, when I sell asset that has appreciated, I pay capital gain taxes.

If this proposal – or something like it – becomes law, and my wife and I die, my daughter confronts a very large tax burden.

When I choose to sell an asset, I normally pay capital gain taxes. I can do some tax planning accordingly. Under the Obama proposal, my daughter cannot take advantage of any planning options to attempt tax reduction that would be available to me, if alive.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Phillip Q. Shrotman is founder and president of Principal Planning Service, Inc. in Long Beach, Calif. He was a professor in the Business Division at Long Beach City College for over 29 years, where he held the position as Coordinator for Financial Planning and Insurance for the college. He holds a Community College Instructors Credential from the University of California at Los Angeles and a master’s from the University of San Francisco. He also holds the profession designations of General Securities Principal of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), Series 7 and 24. He has appeared as a guest on KABC Talk Radio and various television and radio programs.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
Boosting the tax on inherited wealth is a perennial goal of some politicians. And while the White House’s latest plan to boost the levy on estates faces a dim future in a GOP-controlled Congress, the concept will continue to pop up. There’s a lot wrong with this idea.

President Barack Obama’s budget wants to see an increase in the rate of what some call the death tax from 40% to nearly 60%, when you apply his proposed higher capital gains tax of 28% to what’s left after paying the death levy.

Under current law, when you inherit an asset and wish to sell it, you figure out what’s called your basis. When your parents, or whoever bequeathed you the asset, were alive, the basis was what they originally paid for it. If you inherit your parents’ home, you can bet it’s worth more upon their death than they paid for it. For you as the heir, current law says the basis rises to the property’s fair market value – what it would sell for today.

But under the new proposal, when you inherit an asset, your basis will simply be the decedent's original basis.

Example: Dad buys a house for $10,000. He dies and leaves it to you. The fair market value on the date of death is $100,000, which is the new basis. You sell it for $120,000. Under current law, you have a capital gain of $20,000 (sales price of $120,000 less step-up in basis of $100,000).

Under the Obama plan, you have a capital gain of $110,000 (sales price of $120,000 less original basis of $10,000). If you live in a state with high property values, this could result a substantial tax burden. In California, a state with very high home prices, the average beneficiary would probably be forced to sell their parents' home just to pay the taxes due.

I believe this proposal has very little chance of becoming law. Change that to I hope this proposal has very little chance of becoming law.

The Obama plan contains exemptions for some households, but an enormous number of people still would get slammed. The whole reason we have step-up in basis is because we have a death tax. If assets are liable for tax when Dad owned them, it’s unfair to treat them as liable for tax again when the inheritor sells it. This adds yet another redundant layer of tax on savings and investment. It's a huge tax hike on family farms and small businesses.

This is like a second tax. The first one has a top tax rate of 40% and a standard deduction of $5.3 million ($10.6 million for surviving spouses). Conceivably, an accumulated capital gain could face a 40% death tax levy and then a 28% capital gains tax on what is left. That equals an integrated federal tax of just under 60% on inherited capital gains.

Note that Dad’s original purchase of stocks, bonds and property with after-tax dollars. In other words, Dad earned money and paid taxes on those earnings. With the money he had, after he paid Uncle Sam, he (and perhaps Mom) bought the asset the beneficiary now must pay taxes upon Dad’s death. I know, it’s capital gain taxes. However, when I sell asset that has appreciated, I pay capital gain taxes.

If this proposal – or something like it – becomes law, and my wife and I die, my daughter confronts a very large tax burden.

When I choose to sell an asset, I normally pay capital gain taxes. I can do some tax planning accordingly. Under the Obama proposal, my daughter cannot take advantage of any planning options to attempt tax reduction that would be available to me, if alive.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Phillip Q. Shrotman is founder and president of Principal Planning Service, Inc. in Long Beach, Calif. He was a professor in the Business Division at Long Beach City College for over 29 years, where he held the position as Coordinator for Financial Planning and Insurance for the college. He holds a Community College Instructors Credential from the University of California at Los Angeles and a master’s from the University of San Francisco. He also holds the profession designations of General Securities Principal of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), Series 7 and 24. He has appeared as a guest on KABC Talk Radio and various television and radio programs.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/higher-estate-taxes-bad-idea/feed/ 0
Upsala on seven game win streak http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/flyers-knock-off-cardinals-in-sub-section-quarters/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/flyers-knock-off-cardinals-in-sub-section-quarters/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:07:49 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571945 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Upsala swept the season series, won its seventh straight game and improved to 17-8 overall on the season all in one game, a 53-33 win over Swanville, Tuesday.
The game was closer than the final tally for most of it. The score was tied at 30 in the second half, but Upsala went on a 23-3 run to close out the win. The Cardinals led 27-20 at halftime.
Junior center Kiley Smieja tore down 18 rebounds and scored 14 points, most of the boards were on the offensive end.
Sophomore Katlin Welinski added 18 points and eight rebounds for Upsala.

(3115sportsWuebkersHanson)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Upsala senior Kristin Wuebkers watches after Swanville senior Danica Hanson delivered a pass over her head, Tuesday.

(3115sportsWuebkersHanson) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Upsala senior Kristin Wuebkers watches after Swanville senior Danica Hanson delivered a pass over her head, Tuesday.

“They are a pretty good team,” said senior Brooke Westrich of Swanville. “It was nice that we started playing better together with the playoffs coming.”
Westrich, who had five steals, was happy with how Upsala finished the game.
“It felt a lot better than to have the last minute be free throws, because it is nerve-wracking,” Westrich said.
Swanville was led by eighth-grade guard Emily Beseman, who had 16 points and eight rebounds. Senior Stephanie Koetter had 14 points as well, 13 rebounds and nine blocks.
“We played solid defense all night, just gave up too many second chance points,” said Swanville head coach Aaron Gapinski. “ We ran out of gas towards the end of the game and Upsala was able to capitalize down the stretch to extend their lead.”
Upsala won its fifth and sixth straight games, Feb. 19 and Feb. 20.
Feb. 19, the Cardinals won 49-44 thanks to a big output by senior Sara Herzog.
Herzog had 25 points to lead all scorers. Westrich added 11 rebounds and a six points in the victory.
The sixth straight win was another close one, a 57-51 win over Verndale, Feb. 20.
In the victory, four Cardinals scored in double figures. Smieja led the effort with 14 points and nine rebounds, while Herzog had 13 points, Danica Cheney had 11 and Welinski had 10 points.
Both wins came down to a few clutch free throws by the Cardinals late in the games.
Upsala closed its season with a game at Long Prairie-Grey-Eagle (LPGE), Friday, but results were unavailable by press time.
Swanville came into the loss against Upsala after a 52-49 heartbreaker against St. John’s Prep (SJP), Feb. 19.
In the final seconds, the Bulldogs looked primed for a victory, leading by three as the seconds ticked off the clock. However, Ellen Arnold hit a three for SJP to tie the game and force overtime.
The situation repeated itself at the end of overtime, as Arnold hit another game-tying three in the closing seconds.
In double OT, the game was tied, but SJP had one more possession, and hit another buzzer beater to clinch the win.
“We need to give SJP credit for hitting some amazing shots down the stretch with a lot of pressure on them,” said Swanville head coach Aaron Gapinski.
Swanville, 5-15, played its final regular season game against Onamia, Friday, but results were unavailable by press time.

Royalton 1-2 in games
Royalton fell 52-41 to LPGE, Feb. 19. Haley Olson led the Royals with 13 points.
Feb. 20, the Royals topped Onamia 54-43.
Osakis topped the Royals 48-32, Tuesday.
The last game of the regular season for Royalton was against Browerville, Friday, but results were unavailable by press time.
The Royals, Bulldogs and Cardinals are all in Section 5A North.
The Section 5A North Tournament begins Monday with a play-in game.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/flyers-knock-off-cardinals-in-sub-section-quarters/feed/ 0
Thirteen area wrestlers on to state tournament http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/thirteen-area-wrestlers-on-to-state-tournament/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/thirteen-area-wrestlers-on-to-state-tournament/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 14:06:47 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=571939 Seven wrestlers qualify for Pioneer, four from Royalton and two from Holdingford from Section 7A tournament, Feb. 20-21

By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

The wrestling season came to a finale Friday and Saturday (results unavailable by press time), and 13 Section 7A wrestlers from the area were involved in the season-ending State Tournament festivities after advancing from the section tournament in Pierz, Feb. 20-21.
Seven of those individuals are from Pierz, including four champions.

(3115sportsKapsner)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Pierz sophomore Brett Kapsner looks more like he’s playing wheel barrow in a match against Ogilvie’s Gage Peterson in the quarterfinals of the 170-pound bracket in Pierz, Feb. 20.

(3115sportsKapsner) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Pierz sophomore Brett Kapsner looks more like he’s playing wheel barrow in a match against Ogilvie’s Gage Peterson in the quarterfinals of the 170-pound bracket in Pierz, Feb. 20.

A pair will come from Holdingford, and Royalton-Upsala will have four that moved on.
One was junior Kyle Lange, at 182 pounds, who was a section champion after winning an 11-5 decision in the final.
“I was pretty excited, I really wanted to win the section and get a good draw at state,” Lange said.
Lange, an Upsala High School student, had missed much of the early part of the season with injury, which he said made it tough.
“It’s really tough, because 50 percent of getting in shape for wrestling is wresting actual matches,” Lange said. “The schedule was a lot tougher at the beginning of the year, and it was tougher to get into  it after Christmas because there aren’t as many tournaments.”

(3115sportsTheisen)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Eighth grader Damien Theisen puts Nate Williams in a cradle in a play-in match at 106 pounds.

(3115sportsTheisen) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Eighth grader Damien Theisen puts Nate Williams in a cradle in a play-in match at 106 pounds.

He has managed pretty well. After his three wins at sections Saturday, Lange is a perfect 17-0 this year.
He is joined by teammates Jackson Held (126), Brad Kroll (160) and Clint Gadacz (285) at the state meet.
Held won the 126-pound bracket thanks to a 9-5 decision in the final. Kroll won a true second place match (a match between the second and third place finisher), with a 15-0 tech fall to secure his place. Gadacz fell 6-2 to Pierz’ Austin Gall in the finals of the 285-pound bracket.
The six that join Gall for Pierz include three other champions.
Kolton Eischens won the 152-pound bracket with an 18-2 tech fall. Brett Kapsner won in a 9-1 major decision at 170 pounds, and Brandon Ortman won a 14-2 major decision at 120 pounds to become section champs.
Three other Pioneers moved on to state with runner-up finishes. Reese Kapsner placed second at 106 pounds, losing in a 13-4 major decision to Andrew Missen of Blackduck/Cass Lake-Bena. Jake Andres was second at 113 pounds after being on the wrong end of a 16-1 tech fall against Jace Gerving of

(3115sportsKoetter)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Holdingford’s Jamey Koetter attempts to get Lucas Reiplinger off his back in a 126-pound quarterfinal.

(3115sportsKoetter) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Holdingford’s Jamey Koetter attempts to get Lucas Reiplinger off his back in a 126-pound quarterfinal.

Deer River in the final. Lastly, Andrew Tomala fell by a major decision score of 10-2 to 132-pound champion Zach Scott of Holdingford.
Scott is joined by Huskers teammate Nathan Brinker as a state entrant and section champion. Brinker won the 195-pound title with a 7-1 decision victory.
“It’s going to be tough competition for sure,” Lange said, Tuesday, before state. “If I win my first match, I know there is a tough kid next, but first I have to win that first match, and hopefully I’ll be standing on the podium in the end.”

Pierz team unseeded
The Pierz team wrestled Thursday at the state tournament at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul.
The Pioneers were not seeded, and kicked off action against second-seed Frazee at 11 a.m. in the quarterfinals. Pierz lost 32-23.
In the consolation semifinals, the Pioneers fell once again. This time to West Central Area, 38-28, and were eliminated.

]]>
http://mcrecord.com/2015/02/27/thirteen-area-wrestlers-on-to-state-tournament/feed/ 0