The Morrison County Record http://mcrecord.com Covering community news, sports, current events and provides advertising and information for the Morrison County, Minnesota. Fri, 22 May 2015 19:28:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 LF Community Services offers adult rec summer tennis http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/lf-community-services-offers-adult-rec-summer-tennis/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/lf-community-services-offers-adult-rec-summer-tennis/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 19:28:34 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576243 Little Falls Community Services is organizing adult tennis matches for the summer. Co-ed doubles will be scheduled for Monday evenings; women’s doubles will be will be scheduled for Wednesdays evenings; men’s doubles schedule will vary between Monday and Thursday evenings.
Tennis matches will be scheduled beginning the week of June 1 and continue through the end of August. There is a $30 entry fee per team payable at registration. The deadline to register is Friday, May 22.
To register online visit www.lfalls.k2.mn.us – click on the “Schools” tab and then Community Services. Look for adult tennis leagues under adult recreation. People may also call Community Services (320) 632-7938.

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Flyers close Granite Ridge schedule by winning four straight, finish second http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-close-granite-ridge-schedule-by-winning-four-straight-finish-second/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-close-granite-ridge-schedule-by-winning-four-straight-finish-second/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 19:27:15 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576238 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

The final four games of the Granite Ridge Conference (GRC) season went according to plan for the Little Falls baseball team.
The Flyers swept Albany in a doubleheader, May 15, downed Becker, Tuesday and beat Foley 9-2 Wednesday, to close out the GRC season with an 11-3 record, and a second place finish in the GRC.

(52415sportsKapphahn)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Little Falls senior Logan Kapphahn delivers a toss to first baseman Bryce Zawatzke, Wednesday, against Foley.

(52415sportsKapphahn) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Little Falls senior Logan Kapphahn delivers a toss to first baseman Bryce Zawatzke, Wednesday, against Foley.

In the May 15 wins against Albany, the Flyers’ pitching helped them to the sweep.
In game one, Adam Hallberg struck out six in 4.33 innings, while allowing two runs on seven hits in a 4-3 victory.
The Flyers scored the game-winning run in the top of the sixth inning.
Mitch Boros pitched a perfect seventh to shut down the Huskies.
Justin Jenks had a pair of hits and scored twice for Little Falls, and senior Jeremy Klein went 2-for-3 with three RBIs.
In game two, Boros began where he left off, and went six innings, allowing five hits and just one run, enroute to an 8-1 Flyers victory.
Thomas Bell went 3-for-3 with two runs and two RBIs at the plate, and Thomas Miller scored twice for the Flyers.
The Flyers’ success continued in Becker, Tuesday, as they took down the Bulldogs 2-1.
Miller pitched a complete game, scattering five hits and allowing just one run, while striking out four.
Senior Ben Witt went 2-for-2, and Bell added a pair of hits to lead help out the Little Falls offense.
The Flyers closed out the GRC part of the scheduled with a 9-2 make-up win over Foley, Wednesday.
The Falcons scored twice in the first inning off of senior pitcher Evan Athman, but Athman shut them down the rest of the way.
Athman allowed just four hits and those two runs (one earned) and struck out five.
“All year, every time he  (Athman) goes out there, he does a good job,” said Little Falls head coach Chad Kaddatz. “He is tough to hit, and people struggle. He’s not blowing the ball by people, but he throws that little split finger, and gets a lot of people out on that.”
The Flyers scored runs in all six innings, adding one here and there.
“We would hold them defensively, and then get a run, and hold them, and get a run,” Kaddatz said. “It wasn’t explosive, but just kind of a slow death.”
Jenks went 3-for-4 with a run and an RBI. Daniel Marod added a 2-for-4 day with a run and an RBI.
Kaddatz was encouraged by the play of the Flyers in the win.
“They’ve been playing very well, and this section is tough,” Kaddatz said. “It was nice for our own mentality, that if we play well, we should stack up with any body.”
The Flyers also closed out their regular season with a home game against Monticello, Thursday, but results were unavailable by press time.
The 6AA East Sub-section playoffs begin Tuesday, but the brackets were not yet released at press time.

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Flyers tuned up for sections http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-tuned-up-for-sections/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-tuned-up-for-sections/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 18:26:03 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576234 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Little Falls’ track and field team traveled to two meets recently to prepare for the upcoming playoffs.
The Flyers boys won both meets, one at Pequot Lakes, May 15, and the other at Zimmerman, Tuesday.
At Pequot Lakes, the Flyers tallied 183 points, thanks to six championship finishes.
Jake Anderson won the discus with a monstrous 135-09 toss.
Nick Maslowski won the shot put with a 48-10.5 throw.
Connor Jorgensen continued the field dominance by clearing 12-02, and claiming the pole vault crown.
Tyler Moore added wins the 800 meters (2:05.71) and 1600 meters (4:39.44).
Joshua Kapsner won the 3200 meters with a 10:25.83 time.
The girls team tallied more points than the boys in Pequot Lakes with 194, but trailed the hosts by six to finish second.
They had five winners. Carla Walquist won the shot put with a 37-00.5 toss.
Melissa Geisenhof won the pole vault by clearing 9-03.
Mikel Vacek won the high jump by clearing 4-08.
Kacy Steinmetz won the 1600 meters with a time of 5:42.5, and Amanda Rasinski won the 200 meters with a time of 27.66.
The Flyers boys’ second first place finish came in Zimmerman, Tuesday. The Flyers beat out both Zimmerman and Becker to win the triangular.
Little Falls got first place finishes from: Kyle Kabanuk, 100 meters (11.9) and long jump (18-07); Maslowski, shot put (47-00) and discus (125-08); Zupko, 3200 meters (10:41.8); Mitchell Schirmers, 110 hurdles (17.84); 4×400 relay team (3:56.32); 4×800 relay (8:49.85) and Jacob Massmann, 1600 meters (4:52.8).
The girls finished in second place, despite winning five events.
Makenna Olson won the 100 meters  in 13.1 seconds, while Alice Foote won the 800 meters in 2:30.07.
The 4×100 relay (53.53), 4×200 relay (1:53.36) and 4×800 relay (10:25.71) teams all won.
The Flyers will start the section tournament in Alexandria, Wednesday. The finals for that will be at Rocori High School, Saturday, May 30.

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Teams sought for Dam Fest softball tournament http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/teams-sought-for-dam-fest-softball-tournament/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/teams-sought-for-dam-fest-softball-tournament/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 18:25:20 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576230 Team are sought to take part in the Little Falls Dam Fest softball tournament to be played Saturday and Sunday, June 20 – 21.
The men’s tournament will take place Saturday, June 20, with a $150 entry fee and a maximum of 12 teams.
The co-rec tournament takes place Sunday, June 21, with a $125 entry fee and a maximum of nine teams.
Games will be played under Amateur Softball Association (ASA) rules and each team is guaranteed to play in three games. Payout is based on the number of teams.
For information, contact Joey Masog (320) 232-8258.

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Braham’s Noah Dahlman to host basketball camp in Pierz http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/brahams-noah-dahlman-to-host-basketball-camp-in-pierz/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/brahams-noah-dahlman-to-host-basketball-camp-in-pierz/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 17:23:05 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576225 Former Braham and Wofford standout, Noah Dahlman, will be hosting a basketball camp in Pierz this summer.
Dahlman won three state titles in Braham, before leading Wofford to two NCAA appearances and winning conference player of the year in 2009-10. He currently plays overseas.
The camp will be for those entering fourth through 12th grade, and will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., June  19-20.
Registration can be done at noahdahlman42.com. Any other questions can be directed at Pierz varsity basketball coach Matt Poepping at (320) 360-4918.

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Swanville names its May Athletes of the Month http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/swanville-names-its-may-athletes-of-the-month-2/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/swanville-names-its-may-athletes-of-the-month-2/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 17:21:30 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576220 Swanville High School announced four students as its May Athletes of the Month: Tyler Evans was named for USA baseball, Ellie Koetter for Bulldog softball, Haileigh Sales for USA girls’ track, and Justin Schneider for USA boys’ track.
Evans has played five different positions for the USA baseball team and “has done well at every position,” said Coach Adam Gerads. “Tyler is the kind of kid every coach loves to have. He has done everything us coaches have asked of him and doesn’t bat an eye.”
Gerads noted Evans has also been one of the team’s top pitchers this year, stepping up to the plate for the last half of the season.
“Tyler is a great leader and role model,” Gerads said.
Koetter is a three-year starter at third base for the Bulldog softball team. Coach Tom Bzdok said, “Ellie has really developed into an excellent softball player. She has provided solid defense all year for us, but at the plate is where she really stands out.
“Her hard work, dedication, and commitment to improvement has really paid off. She leads the team in batting and has developed into an aggressive power hotter. Ellie is also respected and looked up to by the younger players. Her leadership can be seen not only on the field, but off the field as well,” said Bzdok.
Schneider is the senior captain of the boys’ track team. Track coach Pete Swisher called Schneider “the Swiss Army knife of the team, as he has shown a willingness to do whatever events the coaches ask him to do.”
Schneider is a high jumper, runs the 400-meter dash, the 800-meter run and relays.
“Justin helps keep things loose at practice with his sense of humor and is always ready to help out in any way that he can. We will miss Justin’s versatility and leadership next year,” Swisher said.
Sales is a junior sprinter and thrower on the girls’ track team.
“This was Haileigh’s first year on the track team and she split time between track and softball. Haileigh is another athlete that has been more than willing to try any event the coaches suggest,” said Swisher. “She endears herself to her teammates with her ready smile and words of encouragement.”
Sales has been a consistent member of the girls 4×100 meter relay, which finished third in the conference track meet, earning All-Conference Honorable Mention honors.
“We look forward to seeing what Haileigh can do next year with a season under her belt,” said Swisher.

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First Green Fair caps off energy challenge in Royalton http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/first-green-fair-caps-off-energy-challenge-in-royalton/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/first-green-fair-caps-off-energy-challenge-in-royalton/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:50:20 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576298 By Tyler Ohmann, Staff Writer

Former Royalton Principal Lee Obermiller, left, talks with area resident Doug Popp, about Popp’s renewable energy projects on his farm, May 14, at the Royalton Green Fair.

Former Royalton Principal Lee Obermiller, left, talks with area resident Doug Popp, about Popp’s renewable energy projects on his farm, May 14, at the Royalton Green Fair.

The first ever Green Fair in Royalton, hosted May 14, put a nice end to a Community Energy Challenge that the city and the school have been working on for the past months.

Students and city organizations, such as the Tree Board, displayed projects having to do with renewable energy and more sustainable living at the fair, which was in conjunction with Minnesota Power.

The school participated in the energy challenge, thanks to the Learn to Earn program from Minnesota Power. Students learned about certain sustainable things in their projects, and did things to earn their school a check of $1,080, presented Thursday.

The city of Royalton, through small business participation, earned $3,359 from the challenge.

Mayor Andrea Lauer said the money will be used to buy more energy efficient LED holiday lights for Royalton.

Lauer was excited about the event.

“It was a way to see how we could work together to live more sustainably, and by working together we have been able to accomplish quite a bit,” Lauer said. “It was really nice to see the community and the students come together for something like this.”

Amanda Oja from Minnesota Power, presented the checks to representatives from the school and the city, and was very impressed with the action Royalton made.

“You ended up doing a really awesome job,” Oja said. “I think the small towns are the ones that rock it, and you guys did a great job.”

The Green Fair lasted from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Royalton High School, May 14.

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Bee-friendly plants may be harder to come by http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/bee-friendly-plants-may-be-harder-to-come-by/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/bee-friendly-plants-may-be-harder-to-come-by/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:43:28 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576288 Neonicotinoid-free plants more and more of an issue for gardeners and beekeepers alike

By Eric Beuning, Correspondent

Honeybee populations all across North America are decreasing at alarming rates. According to the Federal Government honeybees and other pollinators enable the production of at least 90 commercially grown crops in North America. Photo courtesy of  the University of Minnesota Extension

Honeybee populations all across North America are decreasing at alarming rates. According to the Federal Government honeybees and other pollinators enable the production of at least 90 commercially grown crops in North America. Photo courtesy of the University of Minnesota Extension

Chances are people have heard about the drastic and dramatic decline in honeybee populations all across North America. According to the Federal Government honeybees and other pollinators enable the production of at least 90 commercially grown crops in North America.

These pollinators are estimated to contribute around $24 billion to the U.S. economy. As a single species honeybees contribute roughly 15 billion in crop pollination and commercial honey.

A report published by the White House said the number of honeybee colonies has steadily decreased over the course of the last 65 years. It is estimated that in the United States alone there were over 6 million healthy honeybee colonies in 1950. By 1970, that number decreased to around 4 million colonies, with only 3 million colonies by 1990. Today it is estimated that only 2 1/2 million healthy honeybee colonies exist in the country.

A study conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said some of the decline in bee populations can be linked to factors such as the loss of natural forage and inadequate diets. A lack of genetic diversity in bee populations as well as diseases and infestation from the parasitic Varroa mite are other major factors.

Recently, there has been a significant debate about the impact of neonicotinoid pesticides and their ever-increasing potency.

In recent years, several independent organizations and universities, including the Xerces Society for invertebrate conservation and the Harvard School of Public Health have found research indicating a link between the use of neonicotinoid pesticides and the problem known as “colony collapse disorder.”

Neonicotinoids have become more popular in commercial agriculture partly because the application process is safer for workers than spraying.  Neonicotinoids are usually watered in a specific amount which also reduces agricultural run-off to the local waters.

Plants given neonicotinoids often incorporate the pesticide into the plant. Unfortunately neonicotinoids also find their way into the plant’s pollen when it flowers. Bees then take up and can become sick or potentially bring the pesticide laced pollen back to the hive.

A study by Richard J. Gill, Oscar Ramos-Rodriguez and Nigel E. Raine found that field-level exposure to neonicotinoid and pyrethroid pesticides impaired natural foraging behavior and increases worker mortality leading to significant reductions in brood development and colony success. The study also found that combined exposure to different types of pesticides increased the likelihood for honey and bumble bee colonies to fail.

As public awareness has increase some garden centers have started sourcing their plants from nursery suppliers selling neonicotinoid free plants.

“I do advise gardeners to think about planting pollinator-friendly gardens,” said University of Minnesota (UMN) Extension Master Gardener, JoAnn Weaver. “Specific plant lists can be found on the UMN Bee Laboratory site.”

“Key factors in attracting bees include flowers with visible pollen or nectar, rich assortment of bee-friendly plants open in the daytime and square yard groupings of bee attractive species grouped with similar types over a large area,” said Weaver.

“Try to choose a location in full sun and low wind with continuous bloom across the season. This brings and keeps bees in the area.”

“Tall plants attract and slow bees down. You can provide a landing pad for bees that are collecting and feeding with flowers in shades of yellow, blue, violet and white. Those colors are most attractive to bees,” Weaver said.

“In addition, make sure there is a shallow water source nearby such as a shallow bird bath or a plant saucer,” she said.

“Last but not least, try not to use pesticides,” said Weaver. “You should use pesticides only if absolutely necessary. Read the label and use only as directed. Do not apply during the blooming period, when bees visit. Apply when there is no wind. You should apply them in late afternoon or evening after the bees have gone back to the hive. Do not use a dust which clings to the bee’s feet and is taken back to the hive.”

Home gardeners who are concerned and want to avoid brands that have neonicotinoids as part of their pesticide or fertilizer lines can do an Internet search using the term “Neonicotinoid pesticide brands.”

While the debate on the impact of pesticides and their impact on honeybee populations is still being researched and debated there are alternative products and techniques available to the concerned home gardener.

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Risk of Helping Grown Kids http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/risk-of-helping-grown-kids/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/risk-of-helping-grown-kids/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:30:21 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?guid=1c6fca5e27f8916d3592b7d4e16b11aa You saved your entire life for the day you can retire. You brought up your children and you hope that they enjoy productive lives. Unfortunately, one of your children never seems to grow up: dropped out of school, continually got into trouble. You feel you must keep helping this kid – but can you afford to?

The help that you gave so far cost you lots of money, time and energy. It’s good you spent the time and energy. The money, though, might turn into a factor that changes your ideas about life when you retire.

If you have a child in his or her late 20s or early 30s and who just doesn’t seem able to start life, how you handle this dilemma is your choice. There is no right answer. My only suggestion: Make the choice a conscious, informed one.

Sure, your children mean much more to you than just money. But if your child is unable to stand on his or her feet economically, this young person simply becomes a financial drain, especially if you still write the checks.

Granted, some of today’s sprigs carry unprecedented financial burdens. According to The Wall Street Journal, for instance, the class of 2014 entered the big bad world already saddled with the most student debt ever, an average of $33,000 each. Young adults also routinely lug around more credit card debt than they do emergency savings.

You have problems, too. Someday you’re going to get too old to work.

If you spend your retirement money supporting an adult child, you need to realize that the chance of someday receiving support back for your money is slim. Even if it doesn’t turn out to be the case in some distant decade, you must count any cash to an adult child as gone forever – and plan accordingly.

You’ve probably read about loans to family and friends, with reason. More than four out of five people would lend money to a family member who’s fallen on hard times, according to a recent poll at ConsumerCredit.com. Almost half the respondents would help family or a friend pay medical bills or even everyday expenses such as rent, utilities or groceries.

I believe these loans often come with a nasty surprise. No repayment.

Maybe a more laborious road to riches works better for everybody. Has your child tried a peer-to-peer lending company like Lending Club or Prosper? At least put the loan agreement in writing.

Just as important: Is your money really doing your child a favor? Sometimes tough love is best; there looms a time when you won’t be able to help anymore. What will happen to your child then?

If you really stepped back and took a good look, discussed this tough issue with your spouse and decided to support your adult child, go for it. Such an arrangement resembles many other parts of parenting: It’s really all about what’s right for you and your family.

Support might be a good thing. Entitlement isn’t. Make sure your choice fits with what you think important and you will truly do the right thing for you and your child.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Josh Patrick is a founding principal of Stage 2 Planning Partners in South Burlington, Vt. He contributes to the NY Times You’re the Boss blog and works with owners of privately held businesses helping them create business and personal value. You can learn more about his Objective Review process at his website.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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You saved your entire life for the day you can retire. You brought up your children and you hope that they enjoy productive lives. Unfortunately, one of your children never seems to grow up: dropped out of school, continually got into trouble. You feel you must keep helping this kid – but can you afford to?

The help that you gave so far cost you lots of money, time and energy. It’s good you spent the time and energy. The money, though, might turn into a factor that changes your ideas about life when you retire.

If you have a child in his or her late 20s or early 30s and who just doesn’t seem able to start life, how you handle this dilemma is your choice. There is no right answer. My only suggestion: Make the choice a conscious, informed one.

Sure, your children mean much more to you than just money. But if your child is unable to stand on his or her feet economically, this young person simply becomes a financial drain, especially if you still write the checks.

Granted, some of today’s sprigs carry unprecedented financial burdens. According to The Wall Street Journal, for instance, the class of 2014 entered the big bad world already saddled with the most student debt ever, an average of $33,000 each. Young adults also routinely lug around more credit card debt than they do emergency savings.

You have problems, too. Someday you’re going to get too old to work.

If you spend your retirement money supporting an adult child, you need to realize that the chance of someday receiving support back for your money is slim. Even if it doesn’t turn out to be the case in some distant decade, you must count any cash to an adult child as gone forever – and plan accordingly.

You’ve probably read about loans to family and friends, with reason. More than four out of five people would lend money to a family member who’s fallen on hard times, according to a recent poll at ConsumerCredit.com. Almost half the respondents would help family or a friend pay medical bills or even everyday expenses such as rent, utilities or groceries.

I believe these loans often come with a nasty surprise. No repayment.

Maybe a more laborious road to riches works better for everybody. Has your child tried a peer-to-peer lending company like Lending Club or Prosper? At least put the loan agreement in writing.

Just as important: Is your money really doing your child a favor? Sometimes tough love is best; there looms a time when you won’t be able to help anymore. What will happen to your child then?

If you really stepped back and took a good look, discussed this tough issue with your spouse and decided to support your adult child, go for it. Such an arrangement resembles many other parts of parenting: It’s really all about what’s right for you and your family.

Support might be a good thing. Entitlement isn’t. Make sure your choice fits with what you think important and you will truly do the right thing for you and your child.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Josh Patrick is a founding principal of Stage 2 Planning Partners in South Burlington, Vt. He contributes to the NY Times You’re the Boss blog and works with owners of privately held businesses helping them create business and personal value. You can learn more about his Objective Review process at his website.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Holdingford boys win true team title http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/holdingford-boys-win-true-team-title/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/holdingford-boys-win-true-team-title/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:20:16 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576217 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

A total of 413.5 points made the Holdingford boys track and field team back-to-back True Team state champions.
The Huskers boys and girls, and the Pierz girls competed at the True Team State Meet in Stillwater, Saturday, May 16.
For the Huskers’ boys, four event wins helped solidify the points to victory.
The 4×100 relay team took first with a time of 46.05. Another relay earned first, the 4×200 relay team in 1:36.81.
Senior Grant Bullert earned a first with a 21-08.5 leap in the long jump.
Jake Langer took first in the discus with a 142-07 toss.
The Huskers girls team took second place with 393.5 after qualifying as the ninth or wild card team.
The girls had three first place finishes, two on the track and one in the field.
In the field, Mckenzie Schulte won the long jump with a leap of 17-00.
Emily Wolter won the 3200 meters in 11:53.7, and Arianna Vasilj won the 200 meters in 26.62.
Pierz’ girls team was also there, after winning Section 7A.
The Pioneers tallied 221 points.
Taryn Becker totalled 38 points in her four events, and Chelsie Kurtz had 32 points in three events.

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Flyers sneak past Cathedral in 6AA East Sub-section http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-sneak-past-cathedral-in-6aa-east-sub-section/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-sneak-past-cathedral-in-6aa-east-sub-section/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:17:10 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576213 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Little Falls was still in the hunt for a chance to go to the Section 6AA Tournament after a win Tuesday.
The Flyers snuck past Cathedral 1-0, to advance to the double elimination portion of the 6AA East Sub-section.
In the victory, the teams were both scoreless through five innings, but the Flyers’ Chelsea Moran knocked in the game-winning run in the sixth. Moran was 2-for-2 on the day. Katelynn Kanieski came in to score that winning run.
Linzee Gerads went the distance for Little Falls on the mound, allowing just three hits in the shutout win.
However, the Flyers hit a bump when they were beaten in their bid to make it to the semifinal, Wednesday.
Top-seeded Milaca edged the Flyers 3-2 in the game, Wednesday, which was held at Waite Park.
Milaca scored three runs in a rough first inning for Little Falls.
The Flyers settled down on defense after that, but could not notch a run, at least not until the sixth inning.
The Flyers scored twice in that inning as Kanieski drove in a run, and later came around to score in the next one for Little Falls.
The Flyers threatened in the top of the seventh, but were eventually shut down.
Gerads pitched all six innings for the Flyers, allowing seven hits and striking out four.
The Flyers lost to Albany in a loser-goes-home game, Thursday to end their season. A season wrap-up will be in next week’s Record.
Pierz, Holdingford softball season’s end at sub-sections
The softball season came to a close for both Pierz and Holdingford in the first round of the 6AA East Sub-section, Tuesday.
The Pioneers were shut out 6-0 by top-seeded Milaca in their game.
“We went into this game with lots of confidence,” said Pierz head coach Hans Horning.
However, the Pioneers struck out 13 times against Milaca ace, Hannah Johnson, and had only three hits.
Brianna Meyer, Kelsi Stuckmayer and Brittney Boser had the hits for Pierz.
Boser was on the mound for Pierz, and went all six innings, allowing just five hits and two earned runs.
The Pioneers were also shut out 11-0 and 10-0 in a doubleheader, May 15 against the state’s No. 5 ranked Rockford.
Hannah Kahl had two hits for the Pioneers in the losses.
Pierz finishes the season with a 1-19 record, and loses six seniors in Kendra Fischer, Shelbie Boser, Talyre Boser, Katelyn Waytashek, Becca Schlegel and Sammi Gross.
Holdingford’s season came to a close in the sub-section opening round as well.
The Huskers fell 10-4 to second-ranked Rocori.
Rocori led the entire way, as they ended the Holdingford season, giving the Huskers a final record of 4-13.
Maddy Higgins had a hit and two RBIs in the loss.
The Huskers lose two seniors in outfielders Amy Catlin and Chelsey Gerads.

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Commissioners vote 4-1 against third public hearing for campground addition http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/commissioners-vote-4-1-against-third-public-hearing-for-campground-addition/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/commissioners-vote-4-1-against-third-public-hearing-for-campground-addition/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 16:15:39 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576294 By Jim Wright, Correspondent

Fish Trap Lake’s Scenic View campground was on the County Board’s agenda again Tuesday, an almost weekly, time consuming occurrence for the past few months. Owners Jeff and Julie Hardy want to add 30 campsites to the 130 campground and RV sites the resort has had for many years, about 1/2 mile from the lake.

The Hardys have met all the usual requirements of the county’s zoning ordinances, completed lengthy worksheets, paid hundreds of dollars in fees, had the required two public hearings about their request for the conditional use permit (CUP), and attended numerous other county government meetings.

But, other Fish Trap Lake area property owners are requesting that an Environmental Assessment Worksheet (EAW) be done for the property and its proposed campsite construction, before construction is allowed by the county. They have the backing of a petition signed by more than the required 120 residents (200, one of them said) requesting the EAW and a third public hearing.

The commissioners’ agenda included voting on whether or not to require a third public hearing. Before the vote, three of the five petitioners present had quite a bit to say. They opened with a written and signed reminder that their petition requesting the EAW also calling for another public hearing with the County Board.

“As the Fish Trap Lake Property Owner’s Association strives to protect and preserve the quality of Fish Trap Lake and recognizes the potential impact of construction in close proximity and uphill of the lake and as the Association recognizes the fragile nature of the lake which was removed by MPCA from its list of impaired Minnesota Waters less than eight years ago, the Association and other Minnesota residents have requested completion of an EAW for the proposed expansion of the Fish Trap Camping and RV Resort and, in signing the petition, requested a public hearing before the Morrison County Board,” reads the petition.

The document was signed by Mike Flanagan, Mary Thibert, David Thibert, Peg Hartung, James Licari, Jeanne Licari, Peggy Swalm, Scott Schnuckle, Kristin Schnuckle and Charles Salter. All included a Cushing address, except David Thibert’s was Minneapolis and Salter had a Minnetonka address.

Similar arguments, with more reasons included, for having the EAW done, were also read and presented in writing by Hartung and Mary Thibert.

Jeff Hardy said, “I talked with three engineers, and was told the cost for an EWA would be $10,000 to $50,000, but I will do it, if the commissioners require it.”

Commissioner Mike Wilson said, “Having another public hearing about the CUP has nothing to do with the EAW,” and he made a motion that the Board “not have another public hearing about the CUP.”

“What can we gain from another public hearing? We’ve discussed the concerns at length,” Commissioner Jeff Jelinski said.

Commissioner Kevin Maurer said, “I believe the lake owners association are important partners in protecting Fish Trap Lake.”

Commissioners Randy Winscher and Duane Johnson both said, they “would agree to another public hearing only if there would be new information.”

“I believe we’ve given this a lot of time, and I think it’s time to get this wrapped up so we can move on to other matters,” said Wilson.

The vote was 4-1 against having the public hearing, with Maurer casting the one vote for it.

The commissioners have until June 9 to vote to require the EAW or not. If they don’t order the EAW, they will then vote on issuing the CUP, June 23. If the EAW is to be done, the deadline for the CUP would follow the EAW’s completion.

Morrison County Board Briefs

In other business Tuesday, the County Board:

•Approved Public Works Director Steve Backowski’s request to award the contract for the CSAH 43 bridge replacement to Redstone Construction Company Inc. of Mora, who submitted the lowest bid, of the four received, at $999,139 — with a state Local Road Improvement Program grant paying $322,620 of that total, and the county paying $676,518 using funds already in the county’s accounts from state funding;

•Approved a 2015 New Establishment License for 37 Acres RV and Campground, owned by Patrick Prozinski, with a fee of $204.75;

•Approved a 2015 Annual License, for Additional License Services, for Auger’s Pine View Resort’s addition of one lodging unit and one well, with a fee of $43.50;

•Approved a 2015 Tobacco License for Elmdale’s Watering Hole, Bowlus, with no fee indicated;

•Approved the renewal of precious metal dealer licenses to GoldSmith Jewelers and Melgrams Inc.;

•Heard from Veterans Affairs Officer Kathy Marshik that veterans with 75 to 100 percent disability can apply for property tax exclusion up to the maximum of the taxes on $150,000 to $300,000 property depending on the level of their disability;

•Also heard from Marshik that the bronze stars for gravesites are available from the Veterans Service Office in the County Government Center at no charge for the families of veterans who passed away between Memorial Day 2014 and Memorial Day 2015. She said sometimes the medals are stolen from gravesites. Commissioner Duane Johnson suggested people take them home after Veterans Day and put them out again on the next Memorial Day;

•Were told by Marshik about her department’s marketing purchases, using a state outreach grant intended for enhancing services and reaching out to veterans. She said her department spent the funds on marketing items, including the purchase of a tent that they will use for displays at fairs and other events, and office enhancement to create a welcoming atmosphere for veterans;

•Approved two resolutions, presented by Social Services Director Brad Vold and Public Health Director Katy Kirchner, for South Country Health Alliance (SCHA) to be the sole provider of managed care for residents of Morrison County, including MNCare health services being provided through SCHA and Medica for Medical Assistance and MNCare for Children and Families;

•Approved a resolution presented by Kirchner and Vold, showing their support of submitting a funding application to the National Joint Powers Alliance (NJPA) to help increase dental access for Region 5 residents who are in public health care programs;

•Heard from Vold that it is important that applicants for county services fill out forms carefully, since they are unable to make changes after the documents are scanned and saved digitally, and that the Social Services Department either gives the paper copy back to walk-ins or saves the paper copy for 30 days, and that, with an average of 1,448 pages being scanned daily, six full-time staff are involved in that as well as other office support services such as handling a daily average of 95 phone calls and 24 walk-in clients; and

•Heard from Vold that it is important that applicants for county services fill out forms carefully, because they are unable to make changes after the documents are scanned and saved digitally, and that the Social Services Department either gives the paper copy back to walk-ins or saves the paper copy for 30 days, and that, with an average of 1,448 pages being scanned daily, six full-time staff are involved in that as well as other office support services.

The next County Board meeting will be Tuesday, June 2, at 8:30 p.m., in the Board Room at the County Government Center.

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Salads and rhubarb recipes http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/salads-and-rhubarb-recipes/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/salads-and-rhubarb-recipes/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 15:42:42 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576270 Timeless-TastesITALIAN PASTA VEGGIE SALAD

  • 1 lb. dried multi-colored spiral shaped pasta
  • 1 cucumber, seeded and diced
  • 1 can sliced black olives
  • 1 carton grape tomatoes
  • 1 small bunch Broccoli pieces
  • 1 bottle Italian salad dressing, chilled
  • 1 Tbsp. Salad Supreme (in the seasoning aisle)

Cook pasta and rinse in cold water until cool. Toss with all veggies. pour Italian dressing over all and mix until everything is well coated. Chill until ready to serve.

CHEESY POTATO SALAD

  • 2-1/2 lbs. red potatoes cubed
  • 1 c. sour cream
  • 1/2 c. mayonnaise
  • 1/4 c. white sugar
  • 1 c. shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 bunch green onions chopped
  • 1 Tbsp. bacon bits

Place the potatoes into a pot, and fill with enough water to cover, bring to a boil, and cook for about 10 minutes, or until easily pierced with a fork. Drain and set aside to cool.

In a large bowl, mix together the sour cream, mayonnaise, sugar, half of the onions, and half of the cheese. Gently stir in the cooled potatoes. Top with remaining cheese and onions and sprinkle with bacon bits over the top.

BEST EVER CRANBERRY CASHEW SALAD

Bag of Romaine lettuce (usually you find them 3 heads to a bag)

  • 1 red apple
  • 1 green pear
  • 1 c. of cashews
  • 1/2 – 3/4 c. dried cranberries
  • 2 Tbsp. onion diced

Dressing:

  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1/3 c. cider vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon Juice
  • 2/3 c. vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp. salt

Mix together all the ingredients for the dressing. Chop up the apple and pear into small chunks. Chop up the lettuce. In bowl, add the lettuce, apple, pear, cranberries and onion. Top with cashews and then pour dressing over the salad. Toss everything a few times to mix well. Serve right away or lettuce and cashews will get soggy.

(First three recipes submitted by

Shirley Olson, Morrison County Record)

RHUBARB BARS

  • 1 c. flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 c. butter
  • 1 egg
  • 1 Tbsp. milk
  • 2 c. rhubarb, chopped fine
  • 1 pkg. strawberry gelatin

Sift together flour, powder and salt. Cut in the butter. Add the egg and milk. Spread in a greased 9-inch by 9-inch pan. Cover with rhubarb. Sprinkle gelatin over the rhubarb. Make a crumb topping of 1/4 cup butter, 1 cup sugar and 1/2 cup flour. Spread this mixture on top. Bake 45 minutes in a 375° oven.

RHUBARB BANANA CRISP

  • 4 c. rhubarb, cut into 1/2 inch slices
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 2 large bananas, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg

Combine above ingredients in a buttered, glass 9-inch dish, them combine in a bowl:

  • 1/2 c. flour
  • 1/2 c. rolled oats
  • 1/4 c. butter or margarine and 3 Tbsp. brown sugar

Combine above ingredients in a bowl; cut in butter. Spread over fruit mixture. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes. Add some whipped cream when you serve it.

RHUBARB CUSTARD PIE

  • 4 c. fresh rhubarb cut into
  • 1 unbaked 9” pastry  shell
  • 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
  • 1 c. sugar
  • 4 slightly beaten eggs
  • 1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg

Place rhubarb in pastry shell. Combine sugar, flour and nutmeg. Add eggs, beat well. Pour the egg mixture into pastry shell. (To prevent overbrowning, cover edge with foil).  Bake in 375° oven for 25 minutes. Remove foil, bake 20 minutes more or until pie is nearly set. Pie will appear soft in the center, but sets up upon cooling. Makes eight servings.

RHUBARB MUFFINS

  • 1 – 1/4 c. brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • 2 – 1/2 c. flour
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2/3 sour milk
  • 1 1/2 c. diced rhubarb
  • 1/2 c. oil
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. soda and 1 tsp. baking powder
  • Chopped nuts

Mix brown sugar, oil, egg and vanilla. Stir in dry ingredients and sour milk. Then add rhubarb and nuts and put in greased muffin pans. Sprinkle on top: 1 tablespoon melted butter or margarine, 2/3 cup brown sugar, 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Bake at 350° until done.

RHUBARB CUSTARD BARS

  • 2 c. all-purpose flour
  • 2 – 3/4 c. white sugar, divided
  • 1 c. cold butter, cut into cubes
  • 7 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
  • 1 c. heavy whipping cream
  • 3 eggs
  • 5 c. finely chopped rhubarb
  • 1 (8 oz.) pkg. cream  cheese, softened
  • 1 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 (8 oz.) container frozen whipped  topping, thawed

Preheat oven to 350°. Combine 2 cups flour and 1/4 cup sugar in a bowl. Cut butter into flour mixture until it resembles coarse crumbs; press into a 9-inch by 13-inch baking dish. Bake in the preheated oven until crust is lightly browned, about 10 minutes. Mix 2 cups sugar and 7 tablespoons flour together in a bowl. Whisk cream and eggs into sugar mixture until smooth. Spread rhubarb evenly over crust. Pour egg mixture over rhubarb. Bake in the preheated oven until bars are set, about 45 minutes. Cool to room temperature. Beat cream cheese, 1/2 cup sugar, and vanilla extract together in a bowl until smooth and creamy; fold in whipped topping. Spread cream cheese mixture over rhubarb layer; chill in refrigerator.

RHUBARB DREAM BARS

Crust: 

  • 2 c. flour,
  • 3/4 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 c. butter

Mix crust and press into 9-inch x 13-inch pan. Bake in 350° oven for 15 minutes.

Filling: 

  • 4 beaten eggs,
  • 4 cups chopped rhubarb
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1/4 c. flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Combine eggs, sugar, flour, salt. Mix. Fold in rhubarb. Pour on top of baked crust. Bake at 350 for 40-55 min until set and edges start to brown.

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Despite weather, Victory League excites http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/despite-weather-victory-league-excites/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/despite-weather-victory-league-excites/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 15:16:27 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576208 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Despite more than half of the games postponed due the storms that rolled through the area, Sunday, May 17, it

(52415portsBoser)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Pierz Brewers catcher Josh Boser, and Buckman base runner Jeremy Payne look at the umpire for the call after a play at the plate, Sunday, May 17, in Pierz.

(52415portsBoser) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Pierz Brewers catcher Josh Boser, and Buckman base runner Jeremy Payne look at the umpire for the call after a play at the plate, Sunday, May 17, in Pierz.

was still one of the most exciting weeks of the Victory League baseball season.
The biggest barn burner of them all was an extra-innings struggle between the Pierz Brewers and the Buckman Billygoats in Pierz.
The threat of weather loomed the entire day, but stayed away long enough to complete a 12-inning Brewers 12-11 victory.
Strong winds to left field led to six jacks over the fence, three for each team.
Buckman’s Jeremy Monson hit one to start things off in the first. The Billygoats would stay on top until Jerron Boser slammed a roundtripper of his own in the third to help the Brewers to a 6-4 lead.
Home runs by Lane Girtz in the fourth and Jeremy Payne in the fifth put the Billygoats back on top, 10-6.
Greg Pohlkamp and Ben Boser hit back-to-back shots in the bottom of the seventh to cut the lead to 10-9, where it would remain until the bottom of the ninth.
In that inning, a Buckman wild pitch would allow the tying run to score, sending the game to extra innings.
Buckman outfielder Noah Boser finally broke the tie with a 12th inning sac fly.
However, the Brewers weren’t done as they scored on another wild pitch, and an Eric Boser single later in the inning drove home the winning run.
The Brewers improved to 3-1 with the win. They will host the Pierz Bulldogs, Sunday, May 24 and will travel to Royalton, Monday, for games.
Buckman, also 3-1, hosts Royalton, Sunday, May 24 and Avon, Monday.

Nisswa edges Skis in
battle of top teams
Two of last year’s top Class C teams battled, Sunday, May 17, but the game ended in a 2-1 Nisswa win in a rain-shortened affair.
The Lightning took the lead in the second with a home run and another run.
The Skis scored their lone run in the third when Kyle Litchy drove in Riley Hirsch.
Tyler Jendro had settled down for the Skis, who had also gotten runners on base the past couple innings, but rain began to be too much to handle after the fifth. Eventually the game was called.
The Skis drop to 2-1 on the season. They will travel to Flensburg, Sunday, May 24, and Randall, Monday.

Pierz upsets Lastrup 1-0
Yet another Victory League game was affected by weather, Saturday night, May 16.
The Pierz Bulldogs won thanks to a third-inning home run by Mark Wawrzyniak.
The Bulldogs did score one more in the top of the sixth, but the game was stopped in the bottom of the sixth with the Lakers threatening. The game was reverted to the last completed inning, and because it was five complete, the game was called a Bulldogs victory.
Brandon Kiel had a pair of hits for Pierz, and Paul Herman had a hit and a stolen base to lead Lastrup.
Lastrup won 9-1 earlier in the day against Royalton.
Chad Weiss pitched seven strong innings, and was 3-for-3 with three RBIs for the Lakers. Rick Schlieman hit a homer, a double, scored a pair of runs and drove in two.
Cade Stang had a pair of hits and scored the lone Royalton run.
The Bulldogs evened their record to 2-2 after the win. They will host Lastrup again, Sunday, May 24 and right after will play against the Pierz Brewers.
Lastrup is 4-2, and will host St. Wendel at 1:30 p.m. in Pierz, Sunday, May 24, prior to the rematch against the Bulldogs.
Royalton (0-5), are at Buckman Sunday, May 24, and host the Brewers, Monday.
Games that were postponed Sunday, May 17, included: St. Wendel at Avon, St. Mathias at Cuyuna, Opole at Flensburg, Fort Ripley at Randall and Royalton at St. Stephen.

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Area athletes on display at sub-section http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/area-athletes-on-display-at-sub-section/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/area-athletes-on-display-at-sub-section/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 15:14:15 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576201 Holdingford wins boys and girls sub-section titles

By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

Many area athletes showed their skills at the sub-section track meet in Pierz, Tuesday, with many earning a trip to the Section 5A meet.

Sub-section boys:
1. Holdingford, 194, 3. Pierz, 102, 5. Royalton, 60
The boys side of the action at sub-sections was dominated by Holdingford, who had seven event champions.

(52415sportsSkibaBullert)   Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann Pierz senior Robbie Skiba, left, pulls ahead of Holdingford’s Grant Bullert, right, and Foley’s Grant Wennerburg in the 110 hurdles at the sub-sections in Pierz.

(52415sportsSkibaBullert) Staff photo by Tyler Ohmann
Pierz senior Robbie Skiba, left, pulls ahead of Holdingford’s Grant Bullert, right, and Foley’s Grant Wennerburg in the 110 hurdles at the sub-sections in Pierz.

Those champions were: Grant Bullert, long jump (20-9.5) and triple jump (40-03.75); Nathan Brinker, shot put (48-04) and discus (138-01); Abe Skwira, 1600 meters (4:42.65); Andrew Zachman, 3200 meters (9:44.38) and Logan Storm, pole vault (12-02).
Pierz had two champions on the boys side in three events: Robbie Skiba, 110 hurdles (15.61), 300 hurdles (40.36) and Jonny Kasper, high jump (5-10).
The top four finishers from individual events, and top two from relay events advanced to the section tournament, which is held at St. John’s University, Wednesday.
Those qualifiers included, for Holdingford: The 4×800 relay team; the 4×100 relay team; Logan Smith, 400 meters; Blake Patrick, 200 meters; Jacob Thell, 3200 meters; The 4×400 relay team; Patrick, long jump; Nick Hellman, triple jump; Jacob Langerud, triple jump; Hellman, high jump; Langerud, discus and Matt Messman, shot put.
Pierz’ section qualifiers included: Skiba, discus; Wohlfeil, 100 meters; the 4×200 relay team; Kyle Becker, 1600 meters; Jordan Boser, 300 hurdles; Wohlfeil, 800 meters; and Kasper, long jump.
Royalton had six events advance to sections: Tremayne Collins, 1600 meters; the 4×800 relay team; Ben Borash, 800 meters; Cole Wentland, 200 meters; Zach Carlson, 3200 meter and Tyler Hellickson, shot put.

Sub-section girls:
1. Holdingford, 143.5, 3. Pierz, 114, 7. Royalton, 31
Holdingford also won the girls action at the sub-section meet.
The Huskers had five sub-section champions in: the 4×200 relay team; Summer Storm, 300 hurdles (49.21); Arianna Vasilj, 200 meters (26.59); Emily Wolter, 3200 meters (11:47) and the 4×400 relay team.
Pierz had two champions, both in throwing competitions. Raychel Virnig won the discus at 105-01, and Beth-el Algarin won the shot put at 34-02.
Several girls qualified for the section meet as well.
From the Huskers it included: Rachael Preusser, 800 meters; Alli Ruprecht, 3200 meters; Angel Rick, 3200 meters; Mckenzie Schulte, long jump; Haily Koopmeiners, high jump; Gabby Langerud, shot put; Ashley Kobernusz, shot put and Langerud, discus.
Pierz’ qualifiers included: Taryn Becker, 100 hurdles; Chelsie Kurtz, 100 meters; the 4×100 relay team; Avy Lease, 400 meters; Becker, triple jump; Kurtz, high jump; Virnig, shot put and Algarin, discus.
Alosha Chieppa, a freshman was the lone qualifier for the Royals for sections. She finished second in the 100 meters, and third in the 200 meters.

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Pioneers win CMC http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/pioneers-win-cmc/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/pioneers-win-cmc/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 15:11:03 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576198 By Tyler Ohmann
Sports Editor
tyler.ohmann@mcrecord.com

A sweep of Rockford in a doubleheader, Wednesday, gave the Pierz baseball team a 13-1 Central Minnesota Conference (CMC) record, enough for a CMC title.
The Pioneers won game one against Rockford by a 3-2 score in eight innings.
Senior Cody Meyer pitched all eight innings, striking out 13 Rockets, and allowing just four hits.
Matt Tautges was 2-for-3 with a run and an RBI, and Noah Boser and Lane Girtz each had multi-hit games for Pierz.
The Pierz offense was on point in game two, as they ripped eight hits to win 11-1 in five innings.
Girtz pitched all five innings, and allowed just one Rockets hit. He also drove in a pair of runs at the plate.
Aaron Weber and Tautges each had a pair of hits for the Pioneers in the win.
“We played very good baseball today, and I am very proud of the kids for this accomplishment,” said Pierz head coach Danny Saehr. “I am very excited the way we are playing right now going into playoffs.”
Pierz finished the season with a 14-4 overall record.
The Pioneers will play in the first round of the 6AA East Sub-section Tournament, Tuesday, against an opponent to be determined.

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LFCHS graduates’ love of horsemanship earns 2015 national awards http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/lfchs-graduates-love-of-horsemanship-earns-2015-national-awards/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/lfchs-graduates-love-of-horsemanship-earns-2015-national-awards/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 15:01:51 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576188 By Gabby LandsverkStaff Writer

Little Falls was well represented at the 2015 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) Nationals, as Little Falls Community High School graduates Chloe Nelson and Dani Schelonka earned third and second place, respectively, in their divisions.

HorsemanshipAwards

LFCHS graduates Dani Schelonka (on horse) and Chloe Nelson (far right) won national awards at the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association championship. Also pictured are fellow U of M Crookston equestrian team member Emily Steeley and Coach Kayla Krueger

Nelson, who competed in the Advanced Horsemanship category, and Schelonka, in Novice Horsemanship, share a lifelong enthusiasm for their sport.

Nelson has loved horses since childhood, when she talked her parents into getting her first horse at 11 years old.

She met Schelonka at a competition where the two were showing their personal horses.

Schelonka also began riding young, at 6 years old after begging for a pony until her parents relented. Schelonka also competed as a barrel racer early on, while Nelson did not.

When the two met, Schelonka convinced Nelson to join 4-H. The two became friends, participating in camps and saddle clubs together, and ended up attending the University of Minnesota in Crookston, albeit one year apart.

“(Chloe) is actually the one who told me to try out for the equestrian team. I probably never would have otherwise,” Schelonka said.

Nelson said she had attended U of M Crookston specifically for the team, and Schelonka found that the program was a good fit for her as well.

This year, both Schelonka and Nelson worked hard to win a number of honors culminating with the national competition.

Both students accumulated a certain number of points throughout the season to make it to a regional competition, at which they ranked in the top two to move on to semifinals.

At semifinals, Schelonka ranked second and Nelson third in their classes, earning the chance to compete among the top 12 riders nationwide in their divisions.

Both Schelonka and Nelson compete in horsemanship, in which riders demonstrate their ability to get the best out of a given horse by gracefully executing a pattern of maneuvers designated by the judge, as well as “rail work,” or demonstrating various gaits like walk, jog and lope.

LFCHS graduate Dani Schelonka prepares for a competition as a member of the University of Minnesota, Crookston Equestrian Team. Schelonka ranked second at the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association national competition for Novice Horsemanship.

LFCHS graduate Dani Schelonka prepares for a competition as a member of the University of Minnesota, Crookston Equestrian Team. Schelonka ranked second at the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association national competition for Novice Horsemanship.

“You have to learn how to control your horse, versus the horse controlling you,” Schelonka said.

Throughout, riders must maintain correct position as well as poise and a “workmanlike appearance,” despite any nervousness they might be feeling.

Even more challenging, the riders are assigned a horse by random draw before the competition, so they need to quickly assess their equine companion’s communication style and adjust accordingly.

Nelson said this requires “feeling out” the horse’s personality and abilities, which is a hard-earned skill.

Chloe Nelson was ranked third in the nation for Advanced Horsemanship through the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association. Nelson, a LFCHS graduate, competed for the University of Minnesota, Crookston Equestrian team.

Chloe Nelson was ranked third in the nation for Advanced Horsemanship through the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association. Nelson, a LFCHS graduate, competed for the University of Minnesota, Crookston Equestrian team.

“It takes a lot of time and knowledge,” Nelson said. “Showing (at competition) is taking the basics to the extreme and really perfecting it.”

Thorough the process of training for competition, and during the shows, riders support and learn from one another, Schelonka added.

“Everybody works really hard and the team aspect is really cool,” Schelonka said. “At a show, it’s a team effort even though everyone is riding as individuals.”

Nelson and Schelonka expressed this through a clear enthusiasm and pride in one another’s performance, accompanied by playful bantering that neither nabbed the top award.

However, there’s always next year, and Schelonka and Nelson plan to pursue their horsemanship at a full gallop moving into their senior year, with new goals and new challenges.

“There’s always progress and light bulb moments. That’s why it’s so rewarding,” Nelson said. “Just the feeling of a good ride is rewarding, no matter what the judge sees that day.”

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LF city administrator salary set at $88,000 – $108,000 http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/lf-city-administrator-salary-set-at-88000-108000/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/lf-city-administrator-salary-set-at-88000-108000/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 14:53:44 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576186 Council looks to have full-time administrator by fall

By Gabby LandsverkStaff Writer

The Little Falls City Council approved a position profile, salary range, timeline and job description for the search for a new city administrator, at the recommendation of search firm David Drown Associates (DDA).

The proposed salary range for the new full-time city official is $88,000 to $108,000, as suggested by Gary Weiers of DDA, who is heading the search for the new administrator.

Weiers said this number was determined based on salaries offered by cities similar to Little Falls.

“What I always do is try to assess the market for comparable positions to arrive at a reasonable number, but it can be a bit of an inexact science,” Weiers said.

Variation in salary will be based on candidate qualifications and experience, said current City Administrator Dan Vogt.

“The person applying has to understand with the salary range (the maximum) isn’t going to be there from the get-go,” Vogt said.

Vogt was hired as a temporary administrator in August 2012 at a reported rate of $50 per hour.

Finance Officer Lori Kasella said hiring an interim administrator was a solution for the city’s financial concerns at the time.

“We were on a tight budget and we didn’t know exactly where things were going,” Kasella said. “Now is a good time (for a full-time administrator).”

Minimum qualifications outlined for the position include a bachelor’s degree in public administration or a related field, as well as five years of management experience, although an ideal candidate would possess a master’s degree and previous city administrator experience.

The extensive list of responsibilities for the new hire, including supervising other city staff and maintaining efficient city operations and development, justify paying what seems a high amount for a rural Minnesota resident, Vogt said.

“It’s not what the man on the street makes, but you’re not trying to hire the man on the street,” Vogt said.

The proposed salary is slightly higher than the ranges set by some communities of comparable size to Little Falls; Waseca, with a population of 9,328, capped its administrative salary at just over $100,000, according to a League of Minnesota Cities survey.

However, the administrator for Detroit Lakes, population 8,631, earned a salary similar to that proposed in Little Falls, totalling $105,393 in 2013.

Redwood Falls, population 5,198, pays its administrator more than $138,000 annually, which Finance Director Missi Meyer said is because the city owns a hospital, apartments and utilities which are all the responsibility of the administrator.

Baxter, population 7,921, also stands out with a reported salary of $120,000 for its administrator, hired in 2009.

City staff in Baxter were unable to clarify how the salary was determined or what hiring process was used, other than that the city did not use a search firm to fill the position.

The salary data listed above does not include benefits.

In related discussion, the Little Falls Council did not reach a decision regarding reimbursement of travel expenses for applicants.

“It’s not much of an investment for us to show a little courtesy,” Mayor Greg Zylka said.

Vogt deemed such reimbursement unnecessary.

“In my opinion, I wouldn’t pay them a dime. If they want the job, they can come up here and look for it,” Vogt said. “It’ll be a great job for somebody. You don’t have to buy them.”

The Council authorized Weiers to advertise for the position and will be accepting applications through June 16, after which DDA will review and rank applicants to select semifinalists.

The finalists will be invited to interview with the Council on June 30 and 31, as well as participate in other activities such as meet and greets and lunch with current Council Members and city staff.

The proposed start date for the new administrator is Sept. 14.

By July 6, the Council hopes to have selected its final candidates, who will then undergo background and reference checks.

Little Falls City Council Briefs

In other business, the Little Falls City Council:

•Decided not to act on a request that the city serve as a fiscal agent for Employment Enterprises, Inc. in the organization’s grant application. The Council cited a lack of information and unwillingness to set a precedent as reasons for not approving the request.

“As fiscal agents, we’re responsible, so if they choose not to spend the money appropriately, that falls on our heads,” said Council Member Frank Gosiak;

•Accepted the resignation of Justin Bieganek from the Planning Commission due to family circumstances;

•Introduced an ordinance to delete the Golf Advisory Board from the city code;

•Approved the purchase of pipe supplies to repair a leak discovered during parking lot improvements to City Hall. The total estimated cost of $40,000 covers spare parts to prevent future breakages;

•Discussed possibly changing the name of the golf course from “country club” to be more inviting to members of the public, at the suggestion of Al Bauman and other members of the Extravaganza Committee;

•Appointed Council Member Leif Hanson as a liaison to the Extravaganza Committee for the golf course;

•Accepted resolutions for the purchase of land abutting the airport to construct an alternate “crosswind” runway. The two properties totalling about 21.506 acres will be purchased for a total of $186,902, of which 90 percent will be covered by federal funds and 5 percent by state funds. The remaining cost will be split between Little Falls and Morrison County;

•Approved first quarter donations to the city, including $300 from resident Rita Radunz to be used for a speed sign; and

•Voted to accept a donation of property near a pre-existing salt/sand shed, at the recommendation of the Park, Recreation and Tree Board. Hanson was the sole opposing vote.

“I think the city already has enough land,” Hanson said. “I’d like the city to sell property, not acquire more.”

The next meeting of the Little Falls City Council is scheduled for Monday, June 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall.

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Two Worries: Rates & Stocks http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/two-worries-rates-stocks/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/two-worries-rates-stocks/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 13:30:36 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?guid=58db0162c752767c88bf61e0d208b803 What happens when interest rates rise? Or worse yet, when the markets decide the current bull run is over? A lot of people worry about these two questions. They shouldn’t.

We recently celebrated the sixth anniversary of the bottom of the financial crisis. Much has changed in the past six years: the Standard & Poor’s 500 returned over 200%, unemployment fell from 10% to 5.4%, and average housing prices have almost recovered to pre-crisis levels. But many investors are hesitant to celebrate for fear that the good times may be coming to an end. 

These investors include those on Wall Street, who nervously wait for the Federal Reserve to signal that it may begin raising interest rates. Just days after the current bull market turned six, in fact, Fed Chair Janet Yellen indicated that rate hikes were on the way.

What is the likely result once rates rise?

Some associate rising interest rates with bad news for bond owners. It’s true that as rates rise, the price of a bond decreases. However, this ignores the fact that the return of a bond depends upon price as well as income. Interest rates may rise and fall, causing the price of the bond to fluctuate, but a bond’s interest payments won’t change.

Total return considers both the change in price as well as income received from a bond. The chart below shows that there is rarely a negative total return for bonds in one-year periods (orange line). A negative return is even less likely when you consider rolling three-year periods (blue line). In other words, history suggests that as long-term investors, we have a good chance of protecting principal.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Barclays_final.png

Also note that bonds’ primary purpose in a well-constructed portfolio is to be a source of stability. Because the past six years have been largely positive ones for the stock market, it may be easy to forget the crucial role bonds played during the financial crisis. Not only were bond returns positive during the downturn, but their stability meant they were a ready source of cash to opportunistically rebalance into stocks.

What if the current bull market ends?

Previously, we wrote about how valuations are not a good way to time markets. In fact, there is no good measure that tells us when the optimal time is to buy or to sell. There is, however, a foolproof way to ensure that you avoid the long-term investor's worst nightmare of buying high and selling low: Maintain the originally targeted balance of stocks and bonds in your portfolio whether the market is up or down.

It can be so tempting to react to current events, especially when the news is frightening. But despite some very scary events, the global market has ultimately marched onward and upward.

Below is the growth of one dollar (green line) invested in a diverse basket of U.S. and international stocks. In the background are geopolitical events (in blue). When the worst happens, we stay committed to our plan by rebalancing from bonds into stocks – which is the best market timing strategy available to us as investors.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Timeline.png

As Warren Buffett told Berkshire Hathaway shareholders in 1994:

“We will continue to ignore political and economic forecasts, which are an expensive distraction for many investors and businessmen … Imagine the cost to us, then, if we had let a fear of unknowns cause us to defer or alter the deployment of capital. Indeed, we have usually made our best purchases when apprehensions about some macro event were at a peak.”

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Scott Keller, CFA, CAIA, is an investment specialist and principal at Truepoint Wealth Counsel in Cincinnati.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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What happens when interest rates rise? Or worse yet, when the markets decide the current bull run is over? A lot of people worry about these two questions. They shouldn’t.

We recently celebrated the sixth anniversary of the bottom of the financial crisis. Much has changed in the past six years: the Standard & Poor’s 500 returned over 200%, unemployment fell from 10% to 5.4%, and average housing prices have almost recovered to pre-crisis levels. But many investors are hesitant to celebrate for fear that the good times may be coming to an end. 

These investors include those on Wall Street, who nervously wait for the Federal Reserve to signal that it may begin raising interest rates. Just days after the current bull market turned six, in fact, Fed Chair Janet Yellen indicated that rate hikes were on the way.

What is the likely result once rates rise?

Some associate rising interest rates with bad news for bond owners. It’s true that as rates rise, the price of a bond decreases. However, this ignores the fact that the return of a bond depends upon price as well as income. Interest rates may rise and fall, causing the price of the bond to fluctuate, but a bond’s interest payments won’t change.

Total return considers both the change in price as well as income received from a bond. The chart below shows that there is rarely a negative total return for bonds in one-year periods (orange line). A negative return is even less likely when you consider rolling three-year periods (blue line). In other words, history suggests that as long-term investors, we have a good chance of protecting principal.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Barclays_final.png

Also note that bonds’ primary purpose in a well-constructed portfolio is to be a source of stability. Because the past six years have been largely positive ones for the stock market, it may be easy to forget the crucial role bonds played during the financial crisis. Not only were bond returns positive during the downturn, but their stability meant they were a ready source of cash to opportunistically rebalance into stocks.

What if the current bull market ends?

Previously, we wrote about how valuations are not a good way to time markets. In fact, there is no good measure that tells us when the optimal time is to buy or to sell. There is, however, a foolproof way to ensure that you avoid the long-term investor's worst nightmare of buying high and selling low: Maintain the originally targeted balance of stocks and bonds in your portfolio whether the market is up or down.

It can be so tempting to react to current events, especially when the news is frightening. But despite some very scary events, the global market has ultimately marched onward and upward.

Below is the growth of one dollar (green line) invested in a diverse basket of U.S. and international stocks. In the background are geopolitical events (in blue). When the worst happens, we stay committed to our plan by rebalancing from bonds into stocks – which is the best market timing strategy available to us as investors.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:Timeline.png

As Warren Buffett told Berkshire Hathaway shareholders in 1994:

“We will continue to ignore political and economic forecasts, which are an expensive distraction for many investors and businessmen … Imagine the cost to us, then, if we had let a fear of unknowns cause us to defer or alter the deployment of capital. Indeed, we have usually made our best purchases when apprehensions about some macro event were at a peak.”

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Scott Keller, CFA, CAIA, is an investment specialist and principal at Truepoint Wealth Counsel in Cincinnati.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Flyers fall to Huskies at sub-section http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-fall-to-huskies-at-sub-section/ http://mcrecord.com/2015/05/22/flyers-fall-to-huskies-at-sub-section/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 13:29:40 +0000 http://mcrecord.com/?p=576181 The Little Falls softball season came to an end last night when the Albany Huskies upended the Flyers 11-2 in a loser-go-home game in the 6AA East Sub-section playoffs.

After leading 2-0 through three innings, the Huskies scored eight runs in the fourth inning, and never looked back.

Little Falls was the fourth seed, and the Huskies were the third seed. Albany immediately faced the loser of the two teams in the winner’s bracket, which was Rocori. The Spartans knocked out the Huskies 8-2.

Milaca and Rocori will move on to the Section 6AA Tournament, Tuesday.

Little Falls ends the season with a 10-12 record. They graduate eight seniors: Celka Buss, Katelynn Kanieski, Kassie Przybilla, Kristin Stewart, Mikayla Gottwalt, Kendra Pohlman, Marissa Virnig and Erin Retka.

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